Archive for the ‘Selected Essays’ Category

  • 2010-11 i.e. Winner: “That’s So Ghetto!” by Pat Origenes

    Date: 2012.03.15 | Category: i.e., Selected Essays | Response: 0

    “That’s So Ghetto!” by Pat Origenes PDF

    Earlier this year, I was hanging around after one of my classes ended for the day.  Few, if any, of us had regularly scheduled meetings afterwards and were often prone to aimlessness after the bell had rung, like so many bits of tapioca suspended in the room, waiting to be consumed by conversation or group impetus towards the door.  My friend Lisa and I were eavesdropping on a conversation among some classmates when the oft-used phrase, “That’s so ghetto!”, was tossed out.  Lisa, ever the champion of the oppressed, immediately objected.  “That’s inappropriate,” she admonished.  “You shouldn’t use that word.”  I accepted observer status as the looks of confusion turned to understanding and then to protests.  Our peers claimed that no racist line had been crossed; the word was not being used in relation to an ethnic group – it was only being used in reference to something of low quality.  Later, I looked up the definition in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) online and was somewhat caught off-guard.  I don’t know exactly what I had been expecting, but I had never considered how old the word was or its origin.  I fall into the same league as my fellow students; within the last few years, I have told people, “I used to live on the ghetto side of Greenlake.”  I’m pretty sure that the Greenlake demographic is mostly Caucasian and not particularly poor; I was only conveying a sense of poverty (that is, in relation to the other side of the lake).  What is happening here?  Why does it evoke such emotion from some people while others say it without a second thought?  A single word, yet many meanings and disparate reactions.

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  • 2010-11 Winner: “Literal and Metaphorical: Racial Themes in Harry Potter” by Kayhan Nejad

    Date: 2012.03.15 | Category: Selected Essays | Response: 1

    “Literal and Metaphorical: Racial Themes in Harry Potter” by Kayhan Nejad PDF

    Ostensibly, J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series creates a world oblivious to race, one in which those of any background can rise according to their abilities alone. However, beneath the surface, Harry Potter encompasses deep-seated racial themes and constructs a complex and highly stratified racial hierarchy. Although the novels depict certain antiquated racial logics, they also ask “questions about cultural, national, and ethnic bias” as well as highlight the “horrors perpetuated by those who pursue [racial purity],” offering a multilayered criticism of the very racial stratification that the series upholds (Whited 8,1). Harry Potter preserves traditional racial attitudes through its narrow emphasis on the White and the Anglo-Saxon, but turns around to challenge these same themes through its depiction of an entirely new, metaphorical racial hierarchy of magical creatures.

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  • 2010-11 Selected Essays

    Date: 2012.03.15 | Category: i.e., News, Selected Essays | Response: 0

    The editorial committee of e.g., UW’s online journal of 100-level writing, is pleased to announce the winning essay for 2010-11:

    Kayhan Nejad, “Literal and Metaphorical: Racial Themes in Harry Potter

    This essay was chosen to represent excellence in academic writing based on the EWPs four Outcomes. Specifically the essay takes a complex view of of the Harry Potter series by reading the novels at two different levels—the more literal level and a metaphorical level—and in so doing puts the novels in critical conversation with themselves. The paper also engages with the critical conversations surrounding Rowling’s series through a variety of academic sources, including literary criticism and scholarly journals. His essay follows a clearly articulated line of inquiry that leads the reader through a multi-stage argument.

    And our i.e. winner for 2010-11:

    Pat Origenes, “That’s So Ghetto!”

    This essay was chosen to represent excellence in genre writing. Modeled on Beverely Gross’s “Bitch,” the essay constructs an academic argument about the meanings and stakes of “Ghetto” by employing academically non-traditional evidence such as personal experience, dictionary definitions (both “traditional” like the OED and “non-traditional” like slang dictionaries), contemporary media sources, and interviews. The author also makes stylistic choices to target audiences that might fall outside of traditional “academic” audiences and in so doing demonstrates the broad stakes of recognizing the power of language.

    Selections for the journal were made by members of e.g. editorial committee.  All members present at editorial committee meetings offer an opinion on which essays should be selected for publication, except in cases where an editor happens to be the instructor of one of the student submitters.  In this case, the editor does not read, evaluate, or offer an opinion/vote on work submitted by his or her former student.

    The e.g. editorial committee found the above works to be an exemplary piece of 100-level writing demonstrating excellence in claim and communication and proficiency in the Expository Writing Program’s outcomes

  • 2009-10 i.e. Winner: “‘Cinderella': An Excerpt From Bedtime Stories with Holden Caulfield” by Sarah Montgomery

    Date: 2010.11.29 | Category: i.e., Selected Essays | Response: 0

    “’Cinderella': An Excerpt From Bedtime Stories with Holden Caulfield” by Sarah Montgomery PDF

    “I’ve had quite a few opportunities to lose my virginity and all, but I’ve never got around to it yet. Something always happens” (Salinger 120). For instance, a couple summers ago there was a girl I liked quite a lot. She was my neighbor, but I hadn’t really spent time with her before that summer. She was always off with her father vacationing. She’s one of those girls that are always off doing something.

    So we finally got to talking. She told me how her father had passed away. On a goddam yacht and all. And he wasn’t even that old. That wasn’t even the bad part though. She’d already lost her mother, and her step-mom and stepsisters were practically witches. They kept her locked up all day and made her do all the chores. She broke down right in front of me.

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  • 2009-10 Selected Essays

    Date: 2010.11.28 | Category: i.e., News, Selected Essays | Response: 0

    The editorial committee of e.g., UW’s online journal of 100-level writing, is pleased to announce the winning essays for 2009-10:

    Paige Edmiston, “The Tell Tale Word: The Role of Authorship in Literary Analysis

    Jessica Oscoy, “The Irony of Higher Education

    And our i.e. winner for 2009-10:

    Sarah Montgomery, “‘Cinderella’: An Excerpt From Bedtime Stories with Holden Caulfield

    Selections for the journal were made by members of e.g. editorial committee.  All members present at editorial committee meetings offer an opinion on which essays should be selected for publication, except in cases where an editor happens to be the instructor of one of the student submitters.  In this case, the editor does not read, evaluate, or offer an opinion/vote on work submitted by his or her former student.

    The e.g. editorial committee found the above works to be an exemplary piece of 100-level writing demonstrating excellence in claim and communication and proficiency in the Expository Writing Program’s outcomes.

  • 2009-10 Winner: “The Irony of Higher Education” by Jessica Oscoy

    Date: 2010.11.28 | Category: Selected Essays | Response: 0

    “The Irony of Higher Education” by Jessica Oscoy PDF

    Boys and Girls Club Mission – “To enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens.”  To provide “hope and opportunity” to these members of the organization.

    Part I:

    Cussing, interruptions, and impatience were some of the challenges I was faced with during my volunteer work at the Boys and Girls Club in North Seattle.  Most of the members were Black, Hispanic, and Pacific Islander.  They came from lower class families, and I noticed that they had trouble learning and focusing.  I took an interest in observing the staff because they had great patience for the kids, and they also had unique teaching skills that I wanted to learn.  When members would misbehave, Elayna, one of the staff members, would tell them, “would you rather go pick up garbage or help me wash the dishes?”  The kids quickly chose the option to help and did not even talk back to her. I realized they had great respect for her, something I had not yet gained from members.  I struggled to help the kids with their homework.  I would receive an occasional “I don’t need your help” or “that’s not the way my teacher does it.”  Eventually, I began helping the quieter kids, since I knew they probably would not bad mouth me.  Even though I did not know what to expect when I started volunteering, I knew from the beginning I was going to learn and listen.  I would only help when needed, mainly because I did not know the group’s culture or even if they wanted my help.  The staff had a unique leadership style, something I did not have, and I realized how much they cared about the kids.  If they did not care, they would not be working at the club because it is not an easy task to handle students that are always interrupting and cussing at each other.  Even though I feel that I did not change anyone’s life, I offered a helping hand, even if it was just to wash dishes so the staff, could have more time with the members.  I gained a great admiration for the staff and I believe they taught me more than I taught them. I see that they are passionate about the BGC mission, and they want to see these students be successful and reach their full potential.  Education is their top priority.

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  • 2009-10 Winner: “The Tell Tale Word: The Role of Authorship in Literary Analysis” by Paige Edmiston

    Date: 2010.11.28 | Category: Selected Essays | Response: 0

    “The Tell Tale Word: The Role of Authorship in Literary Analysis” by Paige Edmiston PDF

    Drunkard.  Drug addict.  Depressed.  Dark.  Disturbed.  What do all of these words have in common?  They are all words that feed the enigma of poet and author Edgar Allan Poe.  These words influence readers to love Poe or hate him; to be fascinated or repulsed by him; to be drawn to him or to dismiss him as nothing more than the gloom and doom those words represent.  Poe is an author whose infamous character at times overshadows the notoriety of his works, and as such his works are often viewed in the context of his mythology and the bias that creates.  This begs the question: Should Poe’s character be a factor in evaluating his works?  As with many things, it is important to find a balance.  It is essential that any evaluation of Poe’s works includes both an analysis from the perspective of the author and an analysis of the works as a separate entity.

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  • 2008-09 Selected Essays

    Date: 2010.04.17 | Category: News, Selected Essays | Response: 0

    The editorial committee of e.g., UW’s online journal of 100-level writing, is pleased to announce the winning essays for 2008-09:

    “Turning the Intrinsic Screw: Henry James and Human Nature”
    Caitlin Harding

    “Christina Rosetti’s Goblin Market: Finding the Middle Ground”
    Jasmine Yeh

    The French Lieutenant’s Woman: The Underscores of ‘Freedom’ within Restriction, Fowles’ Bridge between Realities”
    Prisca Youn

    Selections for the journal were made by members of e.g. editorial committee, chaired by Raj Chetty.  All members present at editorial committee meetings offer an opinion on which essays should be selected for publication, except in cases where an editor happens to be the instructor of one of the student submitters.  In this case, the editor does not read, evaluate, or offer an opinion/vote on work submitted by his or her former student.

    The e.g. editorial committee found the above works to be an exemplary piece of 100-level writing demonstrating excellence in claim and communication and proficiency in the Expository Writing Program’s outcomes.

    Judges: Jessica Campbell, Ed Chang, Raj Chetty, Stevi Costa, Brian Gutierrez, Dave Holmberg, Erik Jaccard, Anthony Manganaro, Jason Morse, Caitlin Palo, Alice Pedersen, Kim Trinh

  • 2008-09 Winner: “The French Lieutenant’s Woman: The Underscore on “Freedom” within Restriction, Fowles’ Bridge between Realities” by Prisca Youn

    Date: 2010.04.17 | Category: Selected Essays | Response: 0

    “The French Lieutenant’s Woman” by Prisca Youn PDF

    Fiction usually pretends to conform to the reality…But the chief argument…is to show one’s readers what one thinks of the world around one…
    –John Fowles

    The vast verdure, the whispering sea, the azure of the heavens; Lyme Regis in all its deceitful beauty, masking the harsh and bitter reality of Victorian society, is a fixture of John Fowles’ multi-layered, artfully crafted novel The French Lieutenant’s Woman.  The social struggles within this small pocket of Victorian Britain distinctly portray a much darker image. Fowles weaves the unspoken boundaries of the nineteenth century throughout his work just as they were nuanced in the Victorian attitude. The elements of postmodern literature, such as multiperspectivism, allow The French Lieutenant’s Woman to break through the limits of the Victorian social infrastructure and bring forth the evolutionary characteristics of Charles and Sarah. As the reader pictures their struggles with a twenty first century framework, Fowles’ twentieth century perspective grapples with distant Victorian society to create a bridge between three centuries of shifting ideologies.

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  • 2008-09 Winner: “Christina Rossetti’s Goblin Market: Finding the Middle Ground” by Jasmine Yeh

    Date: 2010.04.17 | Category: Selected Essays | Response: 0

    “Christina Rossetti’s Goblin Market” by Jasmine Yeh PDF

    “Lizzie with an open heart,
    Laura in an absent dream,
    One content, one sick in part;
    One warbling for the mere bright day’s delight,
    One longing for the night.”
    –Christina Rossetti

    Since its publication, literary and social critics have interpreted Christina Rossetti’s Goblin Market in many ways.  Some critics uphold it is a masterpiece empowering women.  Others think much less of it due to the inconsistencies within the text.  This fairy-tale poem portrays two girls, Lizzie and Laura, tempted by goblin men selling a generous variety of fruits in a glen. Lizzie chooses to resist their cries of “Come buy, come buy,” while Laura gives in and trades a lock of her golden hair for the taste of their harvest, becoming insane with longing for it afterwards.  At the end, Lizzie breaks the spell of the goblins on Laura by withstanding their torture and hazing. Most of the critics’ interpretations are focused on either sexuality or the gender war between men and women. However, by assuming Peter Cominos’s Innocent Femina Sensualis in Unconscious Conflict as a basis for analysis, a new reading of the text emerges that embodies both interpretations. Rossetti’s poem depicts two “sisters”[1] who share a bond stronger than the bond between a man and a woman claiming, “For there is no friend like a sister/ In calm or stormy weather” (58).  With the two girls, Lizzie and Laura, Rossetti acknowledges the two extreme perceptions of women as passionless angels and whores (Cominos 163, 165).  Through the poem, she reconciles the two extremes by suggesting that there is a middle ground between the pure and the impure due to that bond of sisterhood.

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The editorial committee of e.g., UW’s online journal of 100-level writing, is pleased to announce the winning essays for 2009-10: Paige Edmiston, “The Tell Tale Word: The Role of Authorship in Literary Analysis” and Jessica Oscoy, “The Irony of Higher Education.” Submissions for the 2011-12 academic year are currently being accepted until the end of September 2012.

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