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Course Offerings and Descriptions
SUMMER 2004

(Descriptions last updated 28 May 2004)

Contents:

 

Notes of Interest

Course Descriptions
The following course descriptions have been written by individual instructors to provide more detailed information on specific sections than that found in the General Catalog. When individual descriptions are not available, the General Catalog descriptions [in brackets] are used.

Add Codes

English classes, 300-level and above, require instructor permission for registration during Registration Period 3 (beginning the first day of classes). If students have not registered for a class prior to the first day, they should attend the first class meeting and/or contact the instructor to obtain the necessary add codes. Some creative writing classes require add codes for registration: see below, or contact the Creative Writing office, B-25 Padelford, (206) 543-9865.

400-Level Creative Writing add codes
Admission to 400-level creative writing classes is by instructor permission only. To obtain add codes, students will be asked to fill out a brief questionnaire, provide an unofficial copy of their UW transcripts, and submit a writing sample. The questionnaire contains more specific information, and can be obtained at either the Creative Writing office (B-25 Padelford, open 11-3 daily, (206) 543-9865) or the English Advising office (A-2-B Padelford).

Senior Seminars
ENGL 497 (Honors Senior Seminar) and ENGL 498 (Senior Seminar) are joint-listed courses; students choose which number to sign up for depending on their individual status. ENGL 497 is restricted to senior honors English majors taking the additional senior seminar required for the departmental honors program. Add codes for ENGL 497 are available in the English Advising office, A-2B Padelford. All other senior English majors should sign up for ENGL 498. Neither ENGL 497 nor ENGL 498 can be taken more than once for credit.

First Week Attendance
Because of heavy demand for many English classes, students who do not attend all regularly-scheduled meetings during the first week of the quarter may be dropped from their classes by the department.  If students are unable to attend at any point during the first week, they should contact their instructors ahead of time.  The Department requests that instructors make reasonable accommodations for students with legitimate reasons for being absent; HOWEVER, THE FINAL DECISION RESTS WITH THE INSTRUCTOR AND SPACE IS NOT GUARANTEED FOR ABSENT STUDENTS EVEN IF THEY CONTACT THE INSTRUCTOR IN ADVANCE.  (Instructors' phone numbers and e-mail addresses can be obtained by calling the Main English Office, (206) 543-2690 or the Undergraduate Advising Office, (206) 543-2634. Mailto e-mail links are also included in the descriptions on this page.)

ESL Requirement for Non-Matriculated Students
Students not previously admitted to the University of Washington (nonmatriculated status) may enroll in ENGL 111, 121, 131, 281, 282, 381, 382, 471, or 481 only if they have met the following ESL requirements: a score of at least 580 on the TOEFL (237 on the computer-based TOEFL), or one of these equivalent scores: 90 on the MTELP, 410 on the SAT-Verbal, 490 on the SAT-Verbal (recentered), or 20 on the ACT English. For more information, consult an English adviser in A-2-B Padelford, (206) 543-2634, mailto:engladv@u.washington.edu

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Freshman English Courses



104 (Introductory Composition)

M-Th 12:00
[Development of writing skills: sentence strategies and paragraph structures. Expository, critical, and persuasive essay techniques based on analysis of selected readings.  For Educational Opportunity Program students only, upon recommendation by the Office of Minority Affairs.]

111 (Composition: Literature)
2 sections: TTh 9:40-11:40; M-Th 12:00
[Study and practice of good writing: topics derived from reading and discussing stories, poems, essays, and plays.] Students not previously enrolled at the University of Washington (non-matriculated status) may sign up for this course if they meet the posted ESL requirements.

131 (Composition: Exposition)
6 sections: M-Th 8:30; M-Th 9:40; M-Th 10:50; M-Th 12:00; MW 1:10-3:10
[Study and practice of good writing; topics derived from a variety of personal, academic, and public subjects.] Students not previously enrolled at the University of Washington (non-matriculated status) may sign up for this course if they meet the posted ESL requirements.

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200-Level Courses


200aA (Reading Literature)
M-Th 8:30-10:40
Gillis-Bridges
(W)
(A-term)
kgb@u.washington.edu
Techniques and practice in reading and enjoying literature. Examines some of the best works in English and American literature and considers such features of literary meaning as imagery, characterization, narration, and patterning in sound and sense. Emphasis on literature as a source of pleasure and knowledge about human experience.] Texts: Shakespeare, Hamlet; Stoppard, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead; Updike, Gertrude and Claudius.


200aB (Reading Literature)
M-Th 9:40-11:50
O'Neill
(W)
(A-term)

joneill@u.washington.edu
We will read works from a variety of genres to develop interpretive skills based on a close attention to textual detail and an appreciation of context. Critical thinking and analytical writing are the means and end of the course. Participation, presentations, and writing are required.
Texts: Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness; Muller, Ways In; Zadie Smith, White Teeth; Shakespeare, Othello; Melville, Melville’s Short Novels.


200 C (Reading Literature)
MW 9:40-11:50
Oldham
(W)

daviso2@u.washington.edu
Exile and Wandering.  In this class we’ll read three wildly different novels that have in common an interest in the experience of exile – political, social and/or moral exile from one’s community and the wandering, physical or spiritual, that results.  As we do so we’ll ask some basic questions about how literature works and adopt some tools that have been developed over the centuries for answering those questions.  The purpose of the class is to introduce the study of literature as an academic discipline.  We’ll consider formal elements, social and historical context and the way that literature speaks to us as individuals and as members of society.  Participation is key to the success of this class:  be prepared to discuss every day, or don’t take the class.  Three papers are also required, with optional revisions.  Texts: Hoban, Riddley Walker; Silko, Ceremony; Galeano, The Book of Embraces.

211aA (Medieval & Renaissance Literature)
M-Th 9:40 -11:50
Simmons’O’Neill
(A-term)

This class is designed to introduce students to selected texts and issues in English literature from the Old English period through Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and to skills necessary to research and to writing about literary texts and contexts. This course may be used toward the VLPA requirement, the “gateway” prerequisites for applying to the English major, and/or the Period 1 requirement for English majors [n.b.: no more than two 200-level courses may apply toward the major period requirement.] We will use a variety of approaches, including films, audio tapes, lectures, full class and small group discussion, library research, access to medieval manuscripts and facsimiles in the UW’s collection, student-led presentations, and annotated bibliography, essay and exam writing. Texts: J. R. R. Tolkien, ed./trans., Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Sir Orfeo; Katharine Wilson, ed., Medieval Women Writers; William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream; photocopied course packet (available at CMU copy center).

213 A (Modern & Postmodern Literature)
TTh 8:30-10:40
Wacker

nwacker@u.washington.edu
This course will trace a transition from the modern period to the cultural norms of the present. We will examine changes both in representations of the social order and in the fabric of representation used in narrative fiction, films and personal narrative. We will place great value on both these lines of response in our reading and viewing. As we read, we will be interested in reconstructing the nature of society, of social roles and institutions, of gender and race as well as the dynamics of individual identity during these two periods, or more properly by the interlude of reaction and transformation that joins the modernist past and our present. However, we will also treat the qualities of representation employed in text and film, including uses of voice, image, point-of-view, atmosphere and patterns of narrative organization that color, comment on and amplify the meaning of events represented. Texts: Hal Foster, ed., The Anti-Aesthetic: Essays on Postmodern Culture; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse; Richard Rodriguez, Days of Obligation; Dubravka Ugresic, The Museum of Unconditional Surrender; photocopied course packet.

225 A (Shakespeare)
Dy 10:50
Gonyer-Donohure
(W)

jengd@u.washington.edu
It’s summertime, and what better time to study and enjoy some of Shakespeare’s most enjoyable, most disturbing, most beautiful, most humorous, most politically charged plays? We will read, analyze, perform, and write about 5 to 6 plays representative of the Shakespearean canon. We will practice close reading and explications, as well as discuss literary and historical context, modern critical approaches, and, perhaps most importantly, the performative possibilities (or rather, the power of performance as interpretation) of each work. In addition to reading film adaptations as critical interpretations, we will be utilizing the various summer Shakespeare performances around the Seattle area, especially the “Shakespeare in the Park” productions. Please be aware that these performances are during the weekends (we will watch no more than three weekend performances). This is a “W” course, so you should be prepared to write. Texts will include individual plays (to be determined) and Bedford Companion to Shakespeare (McDonald, ed.).

229 A (English Literary Culture: 1600-1800)
TTh 9:40-11:50
Easterling

mailto:heasterl@u.washington.edu
A course within which we will use a range of English literary texts from the period 1600-1800 to become better, more resonant readers of early modern literature. This is first and foremost a reading and writing class – plenty of both, and lots to be gained through both with a dynamic range of literature. Texts: Damrosch, et al., eds., Longman Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 1B and Vol. 1C.

230 A (English Literary Culture: After 1800)
MW 9:40-11:50
Lane

cgiacomi@u.washington.edu
This course examines the relationship between England and India during the nineteenth century and early twentieth century. We will begin by reading Elizabeth Gaskell’s Cranford. This novel is set in England, but it features several characters with ties to India. Our discussion of this novel will focus on how the British empire influenced life in England during the Victorian ear. The other readings for the course are a collection of short stories by Rudyard Kipling, including “The Man Who Would be King,” and E. M. Forster’s novel A Passage to India. Both authors focus on British life in India, highlighting the tensions and contradictions of the empire. In addition to these readings, students will complete short research presentations and write three papers. Texts: Gaskell, Cranford; Kipling, The Man Who Would be King and Other Stories; Forster Passage to India.

242 A (Reading Fiction)
MW 10:50-1:00
Barlow
(full term)
(W)

cbarlow@u.washington.edu
Identity and Environment in American Fiction. The environment has often been used in American literature to imagine what it means to live in this nation in particular places and at specific moments in history. This course begins from this theme in order to introduce the process of reading and interpreting fiction more generally. In short, we will explore how environments are depicted in a variety of literary texts and what that indicates about American identity and culture. The primary goal of this course is close reading of fiction as a way to produce thoughtful and engaging arguments. In order to meet this goal we will read mostly novels and short stories, as well as several historical and critical essays, and have discussions about the readings every day in class. Expect active participation in class, regular group work, a mid-term exam, and a final paper completed in several stages. Texts: Willa Cather, The Professor’s House; Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Don DeLillo, White Noise; Sherman Alexie, The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven.

250aA (Introduction to American Literature)
M-Th 9:40-11:50
Harkins
(A term)

gharkins@u.washington.edu
National Belongings. In this course we will ask how different ideas about “America” have been constructed through literary and political representation. We will focus in particular on historical narratives about the relationship between literature and nation, exploring how the search for a specifically “American Literature” has been used to construct or naturalize changing practices of national belonging. Close attention will be paid to conditions of racial, economic, and gendered citizenship as well as to efforts to contest these conditions over time. Our key questions will ask: what is the relationship between nationalism and literature? What does it mean to “belong” in the United States, and how have changing ideas about literature” been central to the promise and limits of national belonging? This intensive summer course will focus on 3 – 4 key novels of the late 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries, which will be read alongside key cultural and political essays of the period. The central novels of the course will be selected from the following list: Charles Brockden Brown, Wieland; Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Herman Melville, Benito Cereno; Edith Wharton, House of Mirth; and John Okada, No No Boy. Texts to include above books plus photocopied course packet.

281aA (Intermediate Expository Writing)
M-Th 10:50-12:30
Thornhill
(A-term)

Savvy Rhetorics and Sneaky Subjectivities. In an era of media and audience sophistication where even one word can encompass a large number of speech acts (such as the use of “dude” in the Volkswagen commercial illustrates), how might we create even more interesting and provocative ways of expressing ourselves and our ideas? This intermediate expository writing course will offer you the chance of working with a small group of students to pursue an intensive investigation into your own writing practices and production to help you develop stimulating and intriguing claims about your ideas and sharpen up your writing style. Throughout the quarter we will also be looking at the ways that our own practice of writing can improve by investigating the expectations and conventions within which we are expected to write. By examining public texts through such academic approaches to language study as Discourse Analysis and Genre Theory, we will intensify our investigation into our own writing by interrogating the social and ideological situatedness of the texts we are writing to improve the substance and reception of our own written production. Our discussions will engage textual, visual and oral instances of culture jamming as well as personal statement writing, public speeches and instructional texts. The intertextual engagement of our own work with those documents will provide a route by which we will interrogate our own writing practices and will help us to create fresh approaches to writing. While the work is creative and interesting, the pace is quite vigorous. You will write many papers and edit copies of your classmates’ work. In addition, you will be reading a number of dense theoretical articles on language and literary study and analysis. No auditors. Students not previously enrolled at the University of Washington (non-matriculated status) may sign up for this course if they meet the posted ESL requirements. Text: John Trimble, Writing With Style; photocopied course packet.

281aB (Intermediate Expository Writing)
M-Th 8:30-10:00
Tollefson
(A-term)

tollefso@u.washington.edu
This course will develop your writing skills through in-class writing, collaborative group activities, discussion, and three writing assignments. Our topic will be the spread of English worldwide, with a focus on the movement to declare English the official language in the United States. We will read a variety of writings about the spread of English and the Official English movement, including policy statements, argumentative works by participants in the debate, and academic analyses. The three writing assignments will develop your ability to write informative, argumentative and research-based writing. No auditors. Students not previously enrolled at the University of Washington (non-matriculated status) may sign up for this course if they meet the posted ESL requirements. Text: Crawford, Language Loyalties.

281aC (Intermediate Expository Writing)
M-Th 12:00-1:40
Simmons-O'Neill
(A-term)

esoneill@u.washington.edu
This is a one-month computer-integrated 5-credit intermediate composition course in which the central theme is common to all of our lives: family. While this theme is common, the nature of our families and our experiences within them vary tremendously. Assignment #1 is designed to begin with your own experiences and memories, and to develop skills of expression these personal narratives in an evocative and purposeful way. In Assignment #2 we turn to the discipline of Social History as a way to understand a specific person, element or event in each person’s family history. This project requires extensive research (both personal and library-based); training will be provided in part by UW libraries History subject area specialists. Peer critiques and daily assignments (including an oral history interview and transcript) are also required. Assignment #3, the Final Portfolio, asks you to bring together your work, and to analyze your learning about family, history and writing this quarter. To be successful in ENGL 281, you will need to come to class regularly, to keep up with daily assignments, and to spend a considerable amount of time outside of class pursuing your research, drafting and revising essays, and commenting on the work of your peers. No auditors. Students not previously enrolled at the University of Washington (non-matriculated status) may sign up for this course if they meet the posted ESL requirements. Texts: Toby Fulwiler & Alan Hayakawa, The College Writer’s Reference; photocopied course packet.

282 A (Composing for the Web)
TTh 10:50-1:00
Dillon

dillon@u.washington.edu
How to write informative and persuasive web pages. Lecture-presentation format plus lab applications. Always meets in lab. Familiarity with Windows environment and Uniform Access (“Dante”) accounts (Unix environment) is recommended preparation for course. Assignments will include creation of group and individual web sites. For further information, see class web site: http://courses.washington.edu/hypertxt/engl282/ No auditors. Students not previously enrolled at the University of Washington (non-matriculated status) may sign up for this course if they meet the posted ESL requirements. Text: Musciano & Kennedy, HTML and XHTML: The Definitive Guide.

283 A (Beginning Verse Writing)
MW 8:30-10:00
Elkun

delkun@u.washington.edu
Intensive study of how to make a poem. This introductory course includes a series of writing experiments with a focus on creativity and craft. Text: Addonizio & Laux, The Poet’s Companion.

284aA (Beginning Short Story Writing)
M-Th 8:30-10:00
Shields
(A-term)

dshields@davidshields.com
Readings, exercises, and assignments intended to get students writing with greater depth of thought and feeling. Text: photocopied course packet.

284 B (Beginning Short Story Writing)
MW 10:50-12:30
Kannberg

chrissay@u.washington.edu
At the heart of this course is an introduction to conventional story workshopping with craft-focused readings of short fiction, both student and published, and developmental exercises centering on techniques of literary fiction writing. A willingness to play on paper with the many aspects of storytelling is primary; a close second is active participation in discussions and in-class writing. Texts: Hansen & Shepard, You’ve Got to Read This; Checkoway, ed., Creating Fiction.

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Upper Division (300- and 400-Level) Courses


310 A (The Bible as Literature)
Dy 8:30
Griffith

jgriff@u.washington.edu
A rapid study of readings from both the Old and New Testaments, focusing primarily on those parts of the Bible with the most “literary” interest – narratives, poems and philosophy. Students will be expected to attend class regularly, keep up with reading assignments and take part in open discussion. Written work will consist entirely of a series of in-class essays done in response to study questions handed out in advance. Text: Michael Coogan, ed., New Oxford Annotated Bible, 3rd ed.

313aA (Modern European Literature in Translation)
M-Th 10:50-1:00
Staten
(A-term)

mailto:hstaten@u.washington.edu
We will read a variety of poems and fictional works from France, Germany, England, and the U.S. in order to get a sense of the complex phenomenon called “modernism,” a style or cluster of styles of writing that flourished from roughly 1910-1930. There is no simple definition of what this term means; like other period terms in literary theory (cf. “romanticism” or “realism’), it refers not to any single quality of literary works but to a diverse set of stylistic characteristics, any of which might be missing from any given work referred to as modernist. Thus the only way to get a sense of how the term works is to read a number of things that are labeled with it and see how they are similar and how they are different. That is what we will do. We will also read a couple of essays that will alert you to how literary critics write about modernism. Our approach to the reading of the literary works will be strictly “formalist.” I do not expect you to already know what formalist reading is or how to do it; this course will teach you. In fact, the literary works you read will teach you, because modernist writing is what the theory of formalist reading is based on. We will spend the first half of the course reading the works of three poets, the last half the work of three prose writers, as follows: Poets: Baudelaire, Eliot, Rilke; Prose writers: Kafka, Woolf, Gide. You will write a short warm-up paper on modernist poetry in the first week, followed by a 3-4 page mid-term paper on the same topic. Your final paper will be a 4-5 page paper on modernist prose. I highly recommend that you buy a manual, handbook, or glossary of literary terms (any one will do), and use it to look up concepts like “modernism,” “romanticism,” “sonnet,” and so forth. You should study the definitions of these terms over and over during the quarter to try to get them firmly into your heads. (Meets with C LIT 320A; A-term) Texts: Eliot, Selected Poems; Kafka, “The Metamorphosis”; Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Gide, The Counterfeiters; photocopied course packet including works of Baudelaire and Rilke.

315 A (Literary Modernism)
TTh 10:50-1:00
Wacker

nwacker@u.washington.edu
(full term)
This course will focus on the literary culture of transatlantic modernism, including key works of fiction and works that shaped the intellectual life of their writers, including Marx, Nietzsche, Freud and Wittgenstein. Texts: Franz Kafka, The Metamorphosis; Sigmund Freud, Civilization and its Discontents; Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness; Frederic Nietzsche, The Birth of Tragedy and the Genealogy of Morals; Ford Maddox Ford, The Good Soldier; Gertrude Stein, Three Lives; William Faulkner, The Sound and the Fury.

323bA (Shakespeare to 1603)
M-Th 9:40-11:50
Streitberger
(B-term)

streitwr@u.washington.edu
Shakespeare's career as dramatist before 1603 (including Hamlet). Study of history plays, comedies, and tragedies. Text: Bevington, ed., Complete Works of Shakespeare.

324aA (Shakespeare after 1603)
M-Th 10:50-1:00
Coldewey
(A-term)

jcjc@u.washington.edu
This course focuses on Shakespeare’s crowning achievements: the four great tragedies (Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, King Lear), and the last of his late romances (The Winter’s Tale, The Tempest). Four quizzes, three short papers. Texts: Greenblatt, et al., eds, The Norton Shakespeare; McDonald, The Bedford Companion to Shakespeare; Bradley, Shakesperean Tragedy.

325 A (English Literature: The Late Renaissance)
TTh 12:00-2:10
Easterling

heasterl@u.washington.edu
This course will consider “the late renaissance” in England through the lens of drama. Shakespeare, of course, is the most vivid emblem to modern readers of the centrality of drama in early modern literary culture. But he was one among a number of dramatists whole collective output created not just an entertainment phenomenon, but a particular way of understanding culture, human nature, etc. We will study the late Renaissance by reading and writing about drama all quarter. Texts: Barker & Hinds, eds., The Routledge Anthology of Renaissance Drama; Parr, ed., The Shoemaker’s Holiday; Shakespeare, Henry V; Much Ado About Nothing.

335aA (English Literature: The Age of Victoria)
M-Th 8:30-10:40
Butwin
(A-term)

joeyb@u.washington.edu
It is safe to say that more of what we commonly call “literature” was produced, printed and consumed (that is, read) in Victorian England (roughly 1830 to 1900) than in all periods that precede it. The course is short, the period long. We will resolve this difference by focusing on several magnificent texts written dead center in the period, each approaching through different means what I also consider to be issues central to the period. In fiction, prose argumentation and in poetry, Charles Dickens, John Stuart Mill, and Robert Browning each describe the complex emergence of the Self in the modern mass society that produced, printed and consumed all that literature. We will read Dickens’ Great Expectations, Mill’s essays On Liberty and On the Subjection of Women and several of the fine dramatic monologues of Browning whose modernity is made to look remarkably like Renaissance Italy. Each of our texts was written within a few years of 1860. There will be frequent one page response papers written during the course and a somewhat longer essay at the end. Brief lectures, lots of discussion. Texts: Charles Dickens, Great Expectations; J. S. Mill, Liberty with the Subjection of Women (ed. Collini); Robert Browning, electronic reserve.

336 TS (English Literature: The Early Modern Period)
MW 7:00-8:50 pm
Luskey

mailto:luskey@u.washington.edu
This class will focus on the relationship between literary modernism and social change in Britain during the first third of the 20th century. Particular attention will be given to the impact of World War I, and the cultural institution of “little magazines,” which sought to foster an aesthetic revolution. (Evening Degree students only, registration periods 1 & 2.) Texts: James Joyce, Dubliners; Rebecca West, The Return of the Soldier; Candace Ward, ed., World War One British Poets; T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land and Other Poems; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; E. M. Forster, A Passage to India; Wyndham Lewis, BLAST1.

337aA (The Modern Novel)
M-Th 8:30-10:40
George
(A-term)

elgeorge@u.washington.edu
Black, White, and Colored – Pleasantville and the Modernist Experience. This multi-media, intensive course (5 weeks) willfocus on defining literary and cultural Modernism, first through the critical study of the film Pleasantville, and then through three not-so-pleasant, still notorious novels alluded to in that relatively conventional film: D. H. Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley’s Lover, J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, and Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird. We will analyze what is disturbingly “modern” about the themes and formats of each text, literally burned by cast members in that film about America in the 1950s and still widely censored in our time. We will investigate why each text was not – and is not – always openly embraced by a variety of viewing and reading audiences. Specifically, we will pose these questions: (1) Why did the novels so shock their contemporary audiences, and why do they continue still to disturb readers in an otherwise popularly “progressive” culture? (2) What did their receptions have to do with the cultural anxieties portrayed in the film Pleasantvilleand the film adaptation of the novel To Kill a Mockingbird? (3) Why do these same modern anxieties continue in our current society – in other words, what hasn’t changed? Course requirements include a sincere interest in exploring these questions via primary reading and secondary research, daily and engaged course attendance (this is an 8:30 a.m. class, and I need you to be there in mind and body), thoughtful discussion, individual and group reports, and a final examination. Texts: Kershner, The Twentieth-Century Novel: An Introduction; D. H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley’s Lover (1928); J. D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye (1951); Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird (1960).

345 A (Studies in Film)
MW 12:00-3:20
Luskey

mailto:luskey@u.washington.edu
Focusing on the film noir tradition, this course emphasizes the development of precise and sophisticated analytical skills for reading film. We will begin by considering the formal and thematic origins of film noir in German Expression before turning to the classic period of American film noir (1941-1958). The course will conclude by examining the persistent appeal of film noir style in more contemporary works from the mid-1970s to the present day. Text: Gianetti, Understanding Movies.

352 A (American Literature: The Early Nation)
Dy 10:50
Griffith
(full term)

jgriff@u.washington.edu
We’ll read and discuss an assortment of novels, stories, poems and memoirs by American authors in the period preceding the Civil War. Students will be expected to attend class regularly, keep up with reading assignments, and take part in open discussion. Written work will consist entirely of a series of brief in-class essays written in response to study questions handed out in advance. Texts: Baym, et al., eds., The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Vol. B, 6th ed.; Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin; Herman Melville, Moby-Dick.

353aA (American Literature: Later 19th C.)
M-Th 9:40-11:50
Emmerson
(A-term)

cemmerso@u.washington.edu
On the Surface of Things: Henry James and Edith Wharton. This course will examine novels and short stories published at the turn of the century by James and Wharton, focusing mainly on both authors’ fascination with the surface of things after a century of inward-gazing fiction. Texts: Henry James, The Golden Bowl; The Wings of the Dove; Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth; Madame de Treymes and Three Novellas.

354bA (American Literature: The Early Modern Period)
M-Th 9:40-11:50
Laufenberg
(B-term)

hjl3@u.washington.edu
An examination of American Modernism, beginning with the poems of T.S. Eliot and others, followed by early and late modernist novels and plays, including those classically associated with the Modernist movement and many challenging and/or following altogether separate threads in the American literary tradition. Authors: Pound, Hart Crane, Moore, Millay, Frost, Stein, Sandburg, Williams, H.D., O’Neill, Toomer, Hughes, Faulkner, Henry Miller, and others.Texts: Baym, ed., Norton Anthology of American Literature, Vol. D; Henry Miller, Tropic of Cancer.

355aA (American Literature: Contemporary America)
M-Th 12:00-2:10
Merola
(A-term)

nmerola@u.washington.edu
Multiethnic Contemporary United States Literature. The rise of ethnic literatures is one of the important trends in contemporary United States literature. In this course we will explore novels and short stories from African-American, Asian-American, and Native American literary traditions. We will also read theoretical and historical pieces regarding the cultural and critical conversations that enabled and accompanied the inclusion of these literatures in the literary canon of the United States. Course texts: Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye; Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior; Louise Erdrich, Tracks; extensive photocopied course packet with theoretical and historical material and short stories by Sherman Alexie, Gayl Jones, Jhumpa Lahiri, Toni Morrison, Bharati Mukherjee, Simon Ortiz, Gerald Vizenor, and others. Course requirements: willingness to read closely and carefully, consistent and engaged participation, 3 or 4 in-class examinations.

358aA (Literature of Black Americans)
M-Th 9:40-11:50
Moody
(A-term)

jmoody@u.washington.edu
This course is subtitled "The Signifyin' Monkey Cuts Class" because it will explore the literary representation of the experiences of blacks and (or in) the UW academy from the eighteenth century through the present. Selected course readings cover a wide range of black modes of “book learning,” cultural wisdom, and practical knowledge. By focusing on learning experiences of African American trickster figures, the course attends to texts that subvert or supplant Euro-American education theories with distinctive black epistemologies. Reading, reading, reading, writing, class discussions, active listening; a few lectures. Daily reading quizzes, analytical commentaries, interim and final exams. Grades based on writing excellence; critical and analytical skills; prompt submission of written assignments. Meets with AFRAM 358aA. Text: H. L. Gates, et al., eds., The Norton Anthology of African American Literature.

359aA (Contemporary American Indian Literature)
M-Th 9:40-11:50
Colonnese
(A-term)

buffalo@u.washington.edu
This class introduces students to the genre of American Indian novel and explores how the works have served as artistic acts of resistance. Meets with AIS 377aA. Texts: DeLoria, Waterlily; Welch, Fools Crow; Winter in the Blood; Erdrich, Tracks; Owens, Dark River.

361aU (American Political Culture: After 1865)
M-Th 6:00-7:50 pm
Cummings
(A-term)

ckate@u.washington.edu
Nature and Nation. This course is grounded in the recognition that representations of nature – environmental and human – have profoundly shaped Americans’ imagination of the U.S. nation, determining who belongs to this social community and who does not. In our reading of literature, film, government documents, and other cultural forms, we will track different historical understandings of “nature” and “nation” from the late 19th-century to the present. We will trouble understandings of nature as a given; we will examine how nature is (re)constructed historically across disciplines; and we will focus on how the category, “nature,” animates imaginings of national and transnational belonging from the official closing of America’s western frontier to the present. The contemporary phenomena we will examine include: “new frontiers” forged by global capitalism, human genomics and space exploration; efforts to conserve the wilderness and its utilization as them park; reconceptualizations of human and the environment. Texts: Octavia Butler, Dawn; Ruth Ozeki, My Year of Meats; Yamashita, Through the Arc of the Rain Forest; DeLillo, White Noise; photocopied course packet.

367aA (Women and the Literary Imagination)
M-Th 12:00-2:10
George
(A-term)

elgeorge@u.washington.edu
“Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?”: Feminist Narratives from Print to Screen.


"Women have always been in motion and for a variety of complex reasons; and their traveling has always been gendered and embodied traveling, situated with complex social, cultural, and historical forces. . . . no single study can do more than tease out some of these forces as they affect specific travelers or generations of travelers." –Sidonie Smith, Moving Lives

The textual focus of this course is on 20th-century dislocated girls and women who venture into some kind of wilderness, physical and psychological; as well, it’s a course that explores the connections between those wild locales and the female travelers who, in conventional social terms, transgress them; finally, it’s a course that questions why these so-called “wild” girls and women get under- or overexposed in the translation of printed text to screen and how readers like you might critically read fiction and film as a clarifying lens of conventional cultural and gender norms – even if other people sitting next to you in bookstores and theatres don’t or won’t.

All of the texts feature girls and women. Some explore Australia, one Africa, and others America. Some of the texts are penned or directed by men. Some are adaptations of stories and novels, some screenplays only. Each was more or less popular in print than on screen. A couple were blockbusters turned cult classics, while others might be destined for the used-rental bargain bin.

Over the course of five weeks, we’ll try to tease out reasons why. Requirements include dedication to keeping an open mind and interest in broadening your horizons of aesthetic, gender, and cultural critique (whatever they are, and without required need for personal revelation on your part, as we’ll have plenty of personal revelations to study from the authors’ texts themselves); keeping up with the reading and screening of written and filmed texts; daily class attendance and engaged discussion with me and others in the class (this is a discussion-oriented course that runs 4.5 weeks, and so distance-attendance is not a viable option); short oral presentations of your readings and written response papers; a final examination that both creatively and critically teases out and identifies the forces that motivate and sustain a variety of female heroines on the move.

Texts will include most of the following – but please do wait until after the first class session to buy books (in case out-of-print editions cause me to substitute texts): Sidonie Smith, Moving Lives: 20th-Century Women’s Travel Writing; Doris Pilkington, Rabbit-Proof Fence (the memoir) and Rabbit-Proof Fence (the film), screenplay by Christine Olsen, directed by Phillip Noyce; Robyn Davidson, Tracks; Maggie Greenwald, The Ballad of Little Jo (written and directed by Greenwald; Joyce Carol Oates, “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?”; and Smooth Talk, screenplay by Tom Cole, directed by Joyce Chopra; Callie Khouri, Thelma and Louise, directed by Ridley Scott; Beryl Brinkman, West with the Wind; Patrick Stettner, The Business of Strangers, written and directed by Stettner.

370aA (English Language Study)
M-Th 10:50-1:00
Tollefson
(A-term)

tollefso@u.washington.edu
This course is an introduction to major issues in English language study. The emphasis is on the links between language and society, with particular attention to issues that are important for teachers. Major topics include socially patterned language variation, dialects, language acquisition, and language in the classroom. Text: Clark, et al., eds., Language: Readings in Language and Culture.

381 A (Advanced Expository Writing)
MW 8:30-10:00
Dillon

(Full term)
dillon@u.washington.edu
What makes Advanced Expository Writing advanced? Not, in this course, the length of the papers assigned, but the variety of types, audiences, and purposes of the papers. We will begin with a little theory about kinds of rhetorical purposes, understanding "rhetorical" as "attempting to increase the reader's adherence to your point of view on a matter." The assignments are designed to give practice writing papers with four different rhetorical purposes. That is, you can choose any topic for the papers, but the paper should be of the type assigned. They should be of moderate length (roughly five pages typewritten). In addition we will devote some class time to advanced points of mechanics and punctuation and the analysis of style as it functions rhetorically. There will be a final paper analyzing the style of a passage of prose which you select. Class will consist of some lecture and discussion, class presentations. Writing groups for each paper. Recommended preparation: good grasp of the conventions of formal prose and habitual reading. No auditors. Students not previously enrolled at the University of Washington (non-matriculated status) may sign up for this course if they meet the posted ESL requirements. Text: Bryn Garner, Oxford Dictionary of American Usage and Style.

381bB (Advanced Expository Writing)
M-Th 10:50-12:20
Kimberly Swayze
(B-term)

swayze@u.washington.edu
This is an advanced writing course that will provide experienced writers with an opportunity to engage questions of language structure and function, style, audience, context, purpose, and rhetorical effects. We’ll look at examples in which discussions of language and its implications are foregrounded as a means to discussing linguistic and rhetorical choices we make in our own writing. Course work will involve stylistic and formal analysis of readings, short writing assignments along with three major papers (analytical, persuasive, and reflective essays), workshop-style editing and revision, and some analysis and practice at the level of the sentence and paragraph. This is an intensive, four-week B-term course. Active participation in class and group/peer discussions, daily assigned work, and individual conferencing form part of the course requirements. Recommended preparation: ENGL 281 or a strong composition background. Junior or senior status recommended. No auditors. Students not previously enrolled at the University of Washington (non-matriculated status) may sign up for this course if they meet the posted ESL requirements. Texts: Martha Kolln, Rhetorical Grammar: Grammatical Choices, Rhetorical Effects; Sandra Silberstein, War of Words: Language, Politics, and 9/11; photocopied course packet.

384aA (Intermediate Short Story Writing)
M-Th 10:50-12:30
Shields
(A-term)

dshields@davidshields.com
Readings, exercises, and assignments intended to get students writing with greater depth of thought and feeling. Text: photocopied course packet.

384bB (Intermediate Short Story Writing)
M-Th 10:50-12:30
Preusser
(B-term)
k_preusser@hotmail.com
[Exploring and developing continuity in the elements of fiction writing. Methods of extending and sustaining plot, setting, character, point of view, and tone. Prerequisite: ENGL 284.]

471bA (The Composition Process)
M-Th 12:00-2:10
Browning
(B-term)

sbrownin@u.washington.edu
This course will introduce you to the theory and practice of teaching writing. As a teacher, you’ll sometimes be faced with conflicting demands, between what you feel to be best practice and what your institution expects. The idea behind this class is to get you acquainted with a tool box of both theory and practice, so that you can make the most informed decisions possible when it comes to teaching writing. No auditors.Students not previously enrolled at the University of Washington (non-matriculated status) may sign up for this course if they meet the posted ESL requirements. Text: photocopied course packet.

491 A (Internship)
*arrange*

Supervised experience in local businesses and other agencies. Open only to upper-division English majors. Credit/no credit only. Prerequisite: 25 credits in English. Add codes, further information in Undergraduate Advising office, A-2-B Padelford (206-543-2634).

492 A (Advanced Expository Writing Conference)
*arrange*

Tutorial arranged by prior mutual agreement between individual student and instructor. Revision of manuscripts is emphasized, but new work may also be undertaken. Instructor codes, further information available in Undergraduate Advising Office, A-2-B Padelford (206-543-2634).

493 A (Advanced Creative Writing Conference)
*arrange*

Tutorial arranged by prior mutual agreement between individual student and instructor. Revision of manuscripts is emphasized, but new work may also be undertaken. Instructor codes, further information available in Creative Writing office, B-25 Padelford (206-543-9865; open 1-5 daily).

496 A (Major Conference for Honors)
*arrange*

Individual study (reading, papers) by arrangement with the instructor. Required of, and limited to, honors seniors in English. Instructor codes, further information available in Undergraduate Advising Office (A-2B Padelford; [206] 543-2634).

497/498aA (Honors Senior Seminar/Senior Seminar)
M-Th 12:00-2:10
Simpson
(A-term)

csimpson@u.washington.edu
History and the Graphic Novel. Although most of us think of them as serious-minded comic books, the illustrated novel or “graphic novel”, as it has come to be called, often documents significant alternative perspectives on the century’s most traumatic historical events and cultural phenomena. In this course, we will look at the manner in which some of the most celebrated graphic novelists have embroidered a distinct form of narrative, one that mixes documentary or journalistic techniques with the aesthetic concerns and license of the storyteller. Course requirements will include a final long paper project, preceded by an abstract, and a rough draft 497: Senior honors majors only (add codes A-2B PDL); 498: Senior majors only. Texts: Spiegelman, Maus: A Survivor’s Tale: My Father Bleeds History; Maus II: And Here My Troubles Begin; Okubo, Citizen 13660; Satrapi, Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood; Sacco, Palestine.

497/498bB (Honors Senior Seminar/Senior Seminar)
M-Th 12:00-2:10
Streitberger
(B-term)

streitwr@u.washington.edu
Shakespearean Comedy.
Text: Bevington, ed., Complete Works of Shakespeare.

497/498 C (Honors Senior Seminar/Senior Seminar)
MW 12:00-2:10
Oldham

daviso2@u.washington.edu

Reading for Technique. This seminar is designed with creative writers in mind, particularly fiction writers. It is modeled on ENGL 581, “The Creative Writer as Critical Reader,” for MFA students. We will read a few novels and several short stories and analyze them from the point of view of practicing writers, rather than as literary critics. This means we will be directed by a different set of questions from those typically mobilized in a senior seminar or other literature class, and we will deploy some fairly hoary but still useful concepts to begin posing those questions. The questions will examine how aesthetic effects are produced, and the concepts will include such fundamental ones as plot, character, voice, and theme. The challenge, in other words, is not in the concepts themselves, as in some more theoretical courses, but in the application of the concepts to concrete instances and in the depth of insight to be gleaned thereby. While the class is designed for writers, and my preference is that it will be composed entirely or at least mostly of writers, non-writers can still learn a lot about how a piece of fiction is put together by concentrated attention to these questions. In addition to the primary texts, we will read some commentaries on writing by writers, which hopefully will help illuminate our questions of craft. If there is time, we will spend a week or two talking about the writer’s social role, political commitments if any, and related vexed questions.

Please note that this is not a creative writing workshop. You will not be producing original creative work for this class. Assigned work will include response essays every two weeks, offering a general technical assessment of the novel or stories under consideration, and examining a particular aspect of the work (i.e., questions of plot, character, voice, etc.). Also, a long essay at the end, modeled on the MFA Critical Essay, in which you examine one or more authors in light of your own aesthetic goals and practice and in light of some relevant, independently researched criticism. The idea is that the response papers will build toward the long essay. The readings reflect my preference for unconventional fiction, but that should not detract from their usefulness as models. I’m requiring more books than I usually do, on the supposition that as practicing writers you will benefit by owning these books long after the course is over, even if we only read selections now. (If you have concerns about the expense, get in touch and I’ll give you some ideas about how to save some money.) (497: Limited to honors seniors majoring in English (add codes in English Advising, A-2B PDL); 498: limited to seniors majoring in English.) Texts: Primary: Hoban, Riddley Walker; Calvino, Invisible Cities; Woolf, The Waves; Pancake, Given Ground; Gass, In the Heart of the Heart of the Country; O’Brien, The Things They Carried; Bambara, Gorilla My Love; Barthelme, Sixty Stories; Baldwin, Another Country; Secondary: Gardner, The Art of Fiction: Calvino, Six Memos for the Next Millenium: Gass, Fiction and the Figures of Life.

499 A (Independent Study)
*arrange*

Individual study by arrangement with instructor. Prerequisite: permission of director of undergraduate education. Add codes, further information, available in Undergraduate Advising office, A-2-B Padelford (206-543-2634)



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Graduate Courses


Add codes are required for all graduate courses, and may be obtained in the English Graduate office, A-105 Padelford, (206) 543-2634.

586A (Graduate Writing Conference)
*Arrange*

590A (MA Essay)
*Arrange*
Research and writing project under the close supervision of a faculty member expert in the field of study, and with the consultation of a second faculty reader. The field of study is chosen by the student. Work is independent and varies. The model is an article in a scholarly journal. Prerequisite: graduate standing in English. Add codes available in English Graduate office, A-105 Padelford (543-6077).

591A (MAT Essay)
*Arrange*
Research and writing project under the close supervision of a faculty member expert in the field of study chosen by the student within the MAT degree orientation towards the teaching of English, and with the consultation of a second faculty reader. The model is an article in a scholarly journal. Add codes available in English Graduate office, A-105 Padelford (543-6077).

597A (Directed Readings)
*Arrange*
Intensive reading in literature or criticism, directed by members of doctoral supervisory committee. Credit/no credit only. Add codes available in English Graduate office, A-105 Padelford (543-6077).

600A (Independent Study/Research)
*Arrange*
Add codes available in English Graduate office, A-105 Padelford (543-6077).

601A (Internship)
*Arrange*
Credit/no credit only. Add codes available in English Graduate office, A-105 Padelford (543-6077).

700A (Masters Thesis)
*Arrange*
Add codes available in English Graduate office, A-105 Padelford (543-6077).

800A (Doctoral Dissertation)
*Arrange*
Add codes available in English Graduate office, A-105 Padelford (543-6077).

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