Yeast Resource Center | Technology driven by biology.
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The YRC is a NIGMS Biomedical Technology Research Center based at the University of Washington in Seattle. Click to learn more about us.

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Learn more about the technologies being developed by the YRC and how they are being applied to biomedical problems.

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Learn how to collaborate with the YRC–leveraging our technology and expertise in your research.

197

Active Projects

230

Collaborators Since 2011

$38M

Annual NIH Dollars Impacted

697

YRC Publications

New Research
elife-2015-highlight

We are developing technology to produce biosensors based on a ligand-binding domain (LBD) that may, in principle, be applied to any target molecule. The power of this method is illustrated in this paper by development of biosensors for digoxin and progesterone.

Read more in eLIFE or in PubMed Central.

nat-comm-2014-highlight

In this work, we combine the results of protein cross-linking mass spectrometry with iterative structural modelling to determine the molecular architecture of the 10-member Dam1p protein complex in S. cerevisiae. Using this technique, we can model conformational changes resulting from binding with microtubules.

Read more in Nature Communications or in PubMed Central.

Latest Publications

Pedros, C et al. (2016) A TRAF-like motif of the inducible costimulator ICOS controls development of germinal center TFH cells via the kinase TBK1. Nat. Immunol. :. PMID:27135603

Greenberg, CH et al. (2016) Structure of γ-tubulin small complex based on a cryo-EM map, chemical cross-links, and a remotely related structure. J. Struct. Biol. 194 (3):303-10. PMID:26968363

Kim, TK et al. (2016) Ixodes scapularis Tick Saliva Proteins Sequentially Secreted Every 24 h during Blood Feeding. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 10 (1):e0004323. PMID:26751078

Feng, J et al. (2015) A general strategy to construct small molecule biosensors in eukaryotes. Elife 4 :. PMID:26714111

Buffon, G et al. (2016) Physiological and Molecular Alterations Promoted by Schizotetranychus oryzae Mite Infestation in Rice Leaves. J. Proteome Res. 15 (2):431-46. PMID:26667653