Yeast Resource Center | Technology driven by biology.
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Collaborate with the YRC. Click to learn more.

Learn more about the technology being developed by the YRC.

Find software developed by the YRC.

Find research articles published by the YRC.

The YRC is a NIGMS Biomedical Technology Research Center based at the University of Washington in Seattle. Click to learn more about us.

Learn more about the technologies being developed by the YRC and how they are being applied to biomedical problems.

Learn how to collaborate with the YRC–leveraging our technology and expertise in your research.

197

Active Projects

230

Collaborators Since 2011

$38M

Annual NIH Dollars Impacted

727

YRC Publications

New Research

We are developing technology to produce biosensors based on a ligand-binding domain (LBD) that may, in principle, be applied to any target molecule. The power of this method is illustrated in this paper by development of biosensors for digoxin and progesterone.

Read more in eLIFE or in PubMed Central.

In this work, we combine the results of protein cross-linking mass spectrometry with iterative structural modelling to determine the molecular architecture of the 10-member Dam1p protein complex in S. cerevisiae. Using this technique, we can model conformational changes resulting from binding with microtubules.

Read more in Nature Communications or in PubMed Central.

Latest Publications

Ziegler, YS et al. (2018) Proteomic analysis identifies highly expressed plasma membrane proteins for detection and therapeutic targeting of specific breast cancer subtypes. Clin Proteomics 15 :30. PubMed PMID:30250408

Starita, LM et al. (2018) A Multiplex Homology-Directed DNA Repair Assay Reveals the Impact of More Than 1,000 BRCA1 Missense Substitution Variants on Protein Function. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 103 (4):498-508. PubMed PMID:30219179

Wang, Z et al. (2018) Defective RNA polymerase III is negatively regulated by the SUMO-Ubiquitin-Cdc48 pathway. Elife 7 :. PubMed PMID:30192228

Mutlu, B et al. (2018) Regulated nuclear accumulation of a histone methyltransferase times the onset of heterochromatin formation in C. elegans embryos. Sci Adv 4 (8):eaat6224. PubMed PMID:30140741

González, DP et al. (2018) CBD-1 organizes two independent complexes required for eggshell vitelline layer formation and egg activation in C. elegans. Dev. Biol. 442 (2):288-300. PubMed PMID:30120927