UW WSU WSDOT




Freeway and Arterial Management

Influence of Operational Strategies on PM3 Measures

The federal funding and authorization bill called Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21), passed by Congress in June 2012, governs U.S. federal surface transportation spending. MAP-21 established a performance- and outcome-based program that requires states to invest in projects that collectively will achieve national transportation goals. With the May 2017 federal rule regarding the third round of performance reporting requirements (“PM3”), centered on congestion and freight systems, every state department of transportation and metropolitan planning organization has several new responsibilities. The objective of this project, led by Cambridge Systematics, is to develop a framework, based on FHWA’s adopted PM3 performance measures and other supporting metrics, that states can use to determine whether their operational strategies and projects are providing the desired and expected operational and cost benefits. The researchers will also document case studies that demonstrate the influence of operational strategies on the reported values of PM3 statistics and related metrics and will document a marketing and outreach plan that shares the outcomes of this project.

Principal Investigator: Mark E. Hallenbeck, Washington State Transportation Center, UW

Sponsors:
Cambridge Systematics
FHWA

Cambridge Systematics Principal Investigator: Richard Margiotta
FHWA Technical Monitor: Rich Taylor
Scheduled completion: February 2021

Curb Allocation Change

Increasing numbers of transportation network company (TNC) trips—such as taxi, Uber, and Lyft—have led to increased demand for loading and unloading curb spots in Seattle. In this study, researchers are gathering data about passenger load zone use and local traffic impacts in a 15-block area before and after a curb allocation change in the South Lake Union area of Seattle. Two blocks of curbs along Boren Avenue currently designated for paid parking will be reallocated for passenger loading from 8:00 to 10:00 am and from 2:00 to 6:00 pm on weekdays.  Researchers will collect data by video, pavement sensors, and manually to measure passenger loading zone activity and their effects on passing traffic. They will use the collected data to evaluate curb use changes, impacts on TNC demand and operation, impacts on traffic, including traffic flow and travel times, impacts on safety, passenger and driver experience, and parking compliance. The methodology demonstrated in this evaluation should help the Seattle Department of Transportation better understand and plan for the impacts of changes in curb parking designation.

Principal Investigator: Anne V. Goodchild, Civil and Environmental Engineering, UW

Sponsors:
Challenge Seattle
Seattle Department of Transportation
King County Metro
Sound Transit

Scheduled completion: June 2019

Enhancing Traffic Incident Management: Phase 2

Traffic incident management (TIM) is the process of coordinating the resources of various partner agencies and private sector companies to detect, respond to, and clear traffic incidents as quickly as possible to reduce the impacts of incidents on congestion while protecting the safety of on-scene responders and the traveling public. This project is looking at how TIM in the Puget Sound region can be improved by incorporating congestion management (CM). Researchers at the UW Center for Collaborative Systems for Security, Safety, and Regional Resilience are building on Phase I of their research to design, prototype, and test three innovations: a Congestion Analysis Engine that will assess the status of real-time congestion and include pre-planned options for implementing planned TIM-CM strategies such as rerouting or signal timing; an enhanced information sharing system that will share real-time data across the TIM and CM teams; and an enhanced system for public communication that will include collaboration with private industry and existing commercial traffic information providers in response to major incidents. The enhancements to our regional TIM system will promote the safety of first responders and the public and will improve the efficacy and coordinated efforts of multiple agencies engaged in incident response and related services.

Principal Investigator: Mark Haselkorn, Human Centered Design and Engineering, UW
Sponsor: WSDOT
WSDOT Technical Monitor: Ron Vessey
WSDOT Project Manager: Doug Brodin
Scheduled completion: June 2019

WSDOT Traffic Operations Support and Congestion Analysis

To better inform its decision making about where to deploy and how to operate its traffic management systems, WSDOT needs information on the performance of its traffic management strategies.  It also needs decision support tools that describe predicted and actual performance benefits. These tools must provide integrated, real-time information that feeds each step in WSDOT’s business process, from initial needs identification through performance monitoring and reporting. As part of ongoing work, TRAC has developed, improved, and operated a data archive and decision support system called TRACFLOW, which produces performance measures that both WSDOT and TRAC staff commonly apply in a variety of analyses. This project will provide technical and analytical assistance in support of the TRACFLOW software and its use. WSDOT staff will benefit from the software support in the operational, planning, and policy decisions that are based on TRACFLOW monitoring and analysis activities. Analytical results will also support long-range planning activities by regional agencies such as the Puget Sound Regional Council.

Principal Investigators:
Mark E. Hallenbeck
John Ishimaru
Washington State Transportation Center, UW

Sponsor: WSDOT
WSDOT Technical Monitor: Monica Harwood
WSDOT Project Manager: Doug Brodin
Scheduled completion: June 2019

SHRP2 Reliability Data and Analysis Tools

This project is looking to improve the monitoring of travel time reliability in both urban and rural areas of Washington state by using products from the Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP) such as SHRP2 reliability data analysis tools. The researchers will create an integrated database within the online traffic data analysis platform Digital Roadway Interactive Visualization and Evaluation Network (DRIVE Net). That database will merge both freeway loop detector and probe vehicle data from multiple sources, so that the implemented functions will be able to generate improved travel time reliability measures for different roadway facilities during different time periods. Furthermore, the use of other data sources, such as for weather and incident data, will enable analysis of travel times under non-recurrent congestion conditions. In further testing, previously calculated travel time reliability data will be used to determine the reliability of level-of-service calculations. The evaluation results will also be used to provide guidance that will help states and metropolitan planning organizations with planning and programming tasks.

Principal Investigators:
Yinhai Wang, Civil and Environmental Engineering, UW
Mark E. Hallenbeck, Washington State Transportation Center, UW

Sponsor: WSDOT
WSDOT Technical Monitor: Monica Harwood
WSDOT Project Manager: Doug Brodin
Scheduled completion: September 2018

TRAC