Small Projects

Fault Tree Analysis for Accident Prevention in Transportation Infrastructure Projects – year 3 (2015-16)


University: ,

PI: Hyun Woo Lee (OSU)
Co-Investigators: Ingrid Arocho (OSU)
Dates: 01/15/2015 – 06/15/2016

The study will combine literature review and content analysis to develop a list of risk factors that lead to contribute to major accident types in transportation infrastructure projects. OSHA’s Fatality and Catastrophe Investigation Summaries will be the main source of data for the content analysis. OSHA requires construction companies to report any type of work-related accidents resulting in the hospitalization of three or more workers. Thus, this summary database contains valuable information regarding safety-related performance, which can be used as a basis for identification of accident types and risk factors.  Read More

3D Virtual Sight Distance Analysis Using Mobile LIDAR Data – year 3 (2015-16)


University: ,

PI: Michael Olsen (OSU)
Co-Investigators: David Hurwitz (OSU), Alireza Kashani (OSU)
Dates: 01/15/2015 – 06/15/2016

This research explores the feasibility, benefits and challenges of a safety analysis for sight distances based on DOT Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS) data. This research will also develop a systematic MLS data analysis framework to evaluate sight distances in different practical scenarios. The use of high density MLS data for sight distance analysis provides a data driven solution to aid decision making for safe transportation, directly aligning with the PacTrans FY2014-2015 theme. Further, it fits directly within Topic Area #3 Technological Impacts on Safety. Read More

Development of Low-Cost Wireless Sensors for Real-Time Lifeline Condition Assessment – year 3 (2015-16)


University: ,

PI: Daniel Borello (OSU)
Dates: 01/15/2015 – 06/15/2016

This research proposes to develop a low-cost wireless sensor to assess the condition of the lifeline bridges following a natural hazard. The primary goal of the sensor will be to minimize cost and increase the ease of installation. Off-the-shelf hardware will be adopted to meet the design criteria, emphasizing multiple year autonomous operation. The sensors will be configured to measure individual member demands, calculated locally at the node, eliminating the challenge of time-synchronization. Structural models will be developed to predict the loss of the structure based on these measurements. The sensors will be paired with a wide-area network, allowing real-time analysis of the entire transportation system following an event. Therefore, this project will deliver a low-cost sensor that can be widely deployed throughout the Pacific Northwest transportation network to provide first responders with an overview of the current state, and route appropriately. Read More

Regional Map Based Analytical Platform for State-Wide Highway Safety Performance Assessment – year 3 (2015-16)


University: ,

PI: Ali Hajbabaie (WSU)
Co-Investigators: Yinhai Wang (UW)
Dates: 01/15/2015 – 06/15/2016

Most traffic crash modeling and safety performance analysis cannot capture impacts of dynamic factors that are often critical for understanding the occurrence mechanism of crashes and are very labor intensive.To address these deficiencies, this proposed research takes advantage of the ongoing DRIVE Net research at the University of Washington to build large-scale safety analysis functions on the data-rich eScience transportation platform. The proposed research has the following objectives: Improve current crash modeling methods; Develop a Safety Performance Index (SPI); Monitor the safety performance of the state highway network on regional map using SPI; Develop a Potential Safety Improvement Index (PSII); Develop safety improvement analysis methods for accident hotspots based on the overlapped SPI and PSII. Read More

Mixed Use Safety on Rural Facilities in the Pacific Northwest – year 3 (2015-16)


University: ,

PI: Nathan Belz (UAF)
Co-Investigators: Billy Connor (UAF), Byron Bluehorse (UAF), Kevin Chang (UI), Ahmed Abdel-Rahim (UI), Mostafa Hegazi (UI)
Dates: 01/15/2015 – 06/15/2016

In the United States, formalized facilities and roadway crossings for non-traditional and non-motorized modes do not exist which jeopardizes the safety of these users in many cases. These factors create a pervasive and systemic nationwide safety issue. This research will address the issues associated with providing safe accommodation, limiting the improper use of public rights-of-way, and maintaining mobility, and provide future guidelines for design, education, and enforcement for mixed-use rural facilities. The goal of this project is to: improve safety and minimize the dangers for all transportation mode types while traveling in mixed-use environments on rural facilities through the development and use of engineering and education safety measures. Read More

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