Small Projects

Safety Data Management and Analysis: Addressing the Continuing Education Needs for the Pacific Northwest – year 3 (2014-2015)


University: ,

PI: Kevin Chang (UI)
Co-Investigators: Cynthia Chen (UW), Robert Perkins (UAF), Ali Hajbabaie (WSU), Shane Brown (OSU)
Dates: 01/15/2015 – 06/15/2016
Led by: University of Idaho (UI) Professor Kevin Chang, this project is the PacTrans Multi-Institution Education Project for 2015-2016.

Safety data collection, management, integration, improvement, and analysis activities are integral to developing a robust data program that leads to more Informed Decision making, better targeted safety investments, and overall improved safety outcomes. Safety data includes crash, roadway, traffic, licensing, and vehicle data. With the increased complexity of the safety data management and analysis activities, and with the limited resources most transportation agencies have, there is a critical need to provide the transportation workforce in the Pacific Northwest with the resources needed to effectively manage and analyze safety data. Read More

Mitigation of Lane Departure Crashes in the Pacific Northwest through Coordinated Outreach – year 3 (2014-2015)


University: ,

PI: David Hurwitz (OSU)
Co-PI: Linda Boyle (UW), Leila Hajibabai (WSU), Billy Connor (UAF), Ahmed Abdel-Rahim (UI)
Dates: 01/15/2015 – 06/15/2016
Led by: Oregon State University (OSU) Professor David S. Hurwitz, this project is the PacTrans Multi-Institution Outreach Project for 2015-2016.

Approximately 60 percent of fatalities on our nation’s roadways are the result of lane departure crashes. In some cases, the vehicle crossed the centerline and was involved in a head-on crash or opposite direction sideswipe. In others, the vehicle left the roadway to roll over or impact one or more natural or man-made objects, such as trees, utility poles, bridge walls, embankments, or guardrails. A variety of transportation engineering solutions have been proposed to mitigate the occurrence of lane departure crashes including but not limited to: the safety edge, nighttime visibility, rumble strips, retroreflectivity, and pavement lane markings. While these strategies have shown varying degrees of promise in particular contexts, they do no immediately address all of the causal factors inherent in road users (motor vehicle and all-terrain vehicle operators) such as fatigue, operating under the influence, distraction driving, etc. Read More

Evaluation of the Social Cost of Modal Diversion: A Multi-Modal Safety Analysis – year 3 (2014-2015)


University: ,

PI: Jeremy Sage (WSU)
Dates: 01/15/2015 – 06/15/2016

Infrastructure investment by public agencies routinely has a multi-faceted objective. Often, considerable components of these objectives may be viewed as attributable to the goal of increasing the social welfare of the residents of the region and users of the transportation system. Transportation factors related to social welfare or social costs may typically be viewed in terms of pollution, congestion, and safety. The realization of social cost savings or benefits (performance) is largely dependent upon the response functions (how the user responds to a change in the transportation system) of users. Response functions are largely an insight to the economic conditions experienced by the user. This project will develop a reliable and implementable performance evaluation of safety projects that is readily implementable by effected jurisdictions. To achieve this evaluation, the project will draw from literature and implement tactics from several research lines, primarily that of the transportation infrastructure investment, social cost, and modal choice literature. Read More

Determination of Creep Compliance and Indirect Tensile Strength for Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG) – year 3 (2014-2015)


University: ,

PI: Haifang Wen (WSU)
Dates: 01/15/2015 – 06/15/2016

Pavement condition greatly affects the safety of driver. For instance, the rutting in wheelpath creates hydroplaning which can leads to loss of control of vehicles. The roughness, e.g. potholes, can pose safety hazards to the driver. Therefore, improving the pavement condition by designing cost-effective long-lasting pavement is of paramount importance. The adoptions of Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG) align well with this goal, when compared to traditional empirical pavement design.

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Safe Main Street Highways (SMSH) – year 3 (2014-2015)


University: ,

PI: Anne Vernez Moudon (UW)
Dates: 01/15/2015 – 06/15/2016

Increases in non-motorized travel also raise important safety issues, as pedestrians and bicyclists constitute the most vulnerable road users. Therefore, tools to identify locations with a high risk of collisions between motor-vehicles and pedestrians or bicyclists are essential to insure that gains in mobility, air quality, and health are not accompanied by higher rates of injuries and fatalities in vulnerable road users. Read More

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