Small Projects

Determination of Creep Compliance and Indirect Tensile Strength for Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG)


University: ,

PI: Haifang Wen (WSU), haifang_wen@wsu.edu
Dates: 01/16/2015 – 06/15/2016

Pavement condition greatly affects the safety of driver. For instance, the rutting in wheelpath creates hydroplaning which can leads to loss of control of vehicles. The roughness, e.g. potholes, can pose safety hazards to the driver. Therefore, improving the pavement condition by designing cost-effective long-lasting pavement is of paramount importance. The adoptions of Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG) align well with this goal, when compared to traditional empirical pavement design.

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Safe Main Street Highways (SMSH)


University: ,

PI: Anne Vernez Moudon (UW), moudon@uw.edu
Dates: 01/16/2015 – 06/15/2016

Increases in non-motorized travel also raise important safety issues, as pedestrians and bicyclists constitute the most vulnerable road users. Therefore, tools to identify locations with a high risk of collisions between motor-vehicles and pedestrians or bicyclists are essential to insure that gains in mobility, air quality, and health are not accompanied by higher rates of injuries and fatalities in vulnerable road users. Read More

An Evaluation of Safety Impacts of Seattle’s Commercial Delivery Parking Pricing Project


University: ,

PI: Anne Goodchild (UW), annegood@uw.edu
Co-Investigators: Edward McCormack (UW)
Dates: 01/16/2015 – 06/15/2016

The City of Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) conducts the Commercial Vehicle Pricing Project in order to improve commercial vehicle load zone access and efficiency in downtown Seattle and more, yet the project does not provide an understanding of the extent to which commercial vehicles circle while looking for available load zones or use parking areas outside of designated load zones. The proposed study will identify the correlations between collision rates and commercial vehicle on-street parking activity. In doing so, it will inform SDOTs revised strategies for Commercial Vehicle Load Zone location, pricing, and design, supporting the design of a safe and commercially accessible urban core. Read More

Relationships among Worker Gender, Communication Patterns, and Safety Performance in Work Zones


University: ,

PI: Jessica Kaminsky (UW), jkaminsk@uw.edu
Dates: 01/16/2015 – 06/15/2016

Safety communication, including safety training, is an important and cost effective tool for achieving excellent safety performance during construction (Hallowell 2010). However, recent work has identified that worker demographics has an impact on how safety knowledge is shared. Thus, the proposed research intends to study how worker gender impacts patterns of work crew safety communication on roadway construction in the Pacific Northwest. This project hypothesizes that work crews with both male and female members (or, gender diverse work crews) show different communication patterns and worse safety performance than crews without gender diversity and investigate this hypothesis by various methods in the project. Read More

Modeling Passing Behavior on Two-Lane Rural Highways: Evaluating Crash Risk under Different Geometric Conditions


University: ,

PI: Kevin Chang (UI), kchang@uidaho.edu
Co-Investigators: Ahmed Abdel-Rahim (UI), Brian Dyre (UI)
Dates: 01/16/2015 – 06/15/2016

The primary goal of this project is to provide a better understanding of a driver’s passing behavior and model their decision-making on two-lane rural highways under different geometric configurations.  This project will specifically examine passing behavior on horizontal curves on two-lane rural highways and explore how the different degrees of curvature influence driver behavior.  The outcome of the project will provide state DOTs with guidelines that allow them to improve the safety and efficiency of traffic operations along this particular type of highway setting. Read More

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