Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC), University of Washington

Welcome

Please read our COVID-19 Update for ADRC research participants

The UW Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) is one of a nationwide network of 30 research resource centers funded by the National Institute on Aging. ADRCs are major sources of discovery into the nature of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias and into the development of more effective approaches to prevention, diagnosis, care, and therapy. The UW ADRC contributes to the development of shared resources that support dementia-relevant research, and coordinates research efforts with other NIH-funded programs and investigators. UW ADRC resources are designed to facilitate and empower related research efforts at UW.

The UW ADRC is closely affiliated with the UW Memory and Brain Wellness Center clinic and links the Seattle community with information and opportunities to participate in studies of Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders (Lewy body dementia, and frontotemporal degeneration, and vascular dementia). Our busy outreach team is influential in promoting strengths-based reframing of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia-friendly communities, and they organize and promote educational public talks and events and research seminars. We support outreach and culturally adapted Alzheimer’s disease programs for Indigenous communities and clinics. Join us!

Director: Dr. Thomas J. Grabowski, MD
Program Manager: Annika Noreen, PhD, PMP

Announcements

Request for Proposals for the 2023-2024 UW ADRC Development Projects!

July 29, 2022 — The UW ADRC offers one-year development projects that use its resources to advance the understanding, diagnosis, and/or treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. In the 2023-2024 period, the UW ADRC aims to fund 3-4 projects of up to $50,000. At least two awards will be reserved for junior applications (Postdoctoral fellows with appropriate senior collaborators or junior faculty up to the rank of Assistant Professor). Please see click the link for eligibility details and key dates, and disseminate widely.


Seattle Alzheimer’s Disease Brain Cell Atlas (SEA-AD) web product and first public data release

July 28, 2022 — The UW ADRC is excited about the official launch of the Seattle Alzheimer’s Disease Brain Cell Atlas (SEA-AD) web product (SEA-AD.org) and the first public release of the project’s data. This release is an important new resource for the Alzheimer’s community. The SEA-AD is a NIA-funded collaboration between the Allen Brain Institute, UW Medicine, and Kaiser Permanente Health Research Institute to create a higher resolution atlas of Alzheimer’s disease at the cellular level, in order to understand the early pathogenesis of AD, disease initiation, and cognitive decline. 


Brian Kraemer awarded $250,000 by Washington Research Foundation to develop small molecules to treat Alzheimer’s disease

April 14, 2022 — "WRF’s generous support has enabled us to make rapid progress on early-stage drug discovery work towards MSUT2-based therapeutics." - UW ADRC's Brian Kraemer, PhD


2022- 2023 ADRC Development Projects

February 23, 2022 — Check out the newly funded ADRC Development Projects for 2022 - 2023. These projects, led by postdoctoral fellows and faculty members, use ADRC resources to advance the understanding, diagnosis, and/or treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

Upcoming Research Events

ADRC Seminar Series: Alison Fohner, PhD, Assistant Professor, UW Epidemiology

  Monday, October 10, 2022   12:00pm - 1:00pm

Online

Title: TBA

More info

ADRC CPC Clinicopathological Correlation Conference [ZOOM]

  Friday, October 21, 2022   9:00am - 10:30am

Online

A presentation of case studies and discussion of new insights into the relationship between neuropathology, genetics, clinical disease manifestation.

More info

ADRC CPC Clinicopathological Correlation Conference [ZOOM]

  Friday, November 18, 2022   9:00am - 10:30am

Online

A presentation of case studies and discussion of new insights into the relationship between neuropathology, genetics, clinical disease manifestation.

More info