Open tenure-line faculty position in inorganic chemistry

UW_W-Logo_RGBApplications are invited for a full-time, tenure-track appointment in the Department of Chemistry. Outstanding candidates in all areas of inorganic chemistry and interdisciplinary areas involving inorganic chemistry will be considered for appointment at the Assistant or Associate Professor level; a hire at the Professor level may be considered in exceptional circumstances.

University of Washington faculty members engage in teaching, research, and service. Successful candidates will be expected to participate in undergraduate and graduate teaching and to develop innovative, vigorous, externally-funded research programs. Applicants must have a Ph.D. or foreign equivalent degree by date of appointment.

For information about the Department and to apply, visit http://apply.interfolio.com/38686; applications should include a cover letter, curriculum vitae, statement of future research interests, and (at the Assistant Professor rank) three letters of reference. Priority will be given to complete applications received by November 14, 2016. The search will be led by Professor Julia Kovacs; please direct all inquiries or disability accommodation requests to search@chem.washington.edu.

University of Washington is an affirmative action and equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, age, protected veteran or disabled status, or genetic information.

Sotiris Xantheas to join faculty

xantheas-squareWe are delighted to announce that Sotiris S. Xantheas has joined the Department as Affiliate Professor of Chemistry. He also holds the title of UW-PNNL Distinguished Faculty Fellow.

Dr. Xantheas is a Laboratory Fellow in Chemical Physics & Analysis, part of the Physical Sciences Division at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Dr. Xantheas is widely recognized for his expertise related to the molecular science of aqueous systems. His innovative studies of intermolecular interactions in aqueous ionic clusters and use of ab initio electronic structure calculations to elucidate their structural and spectral features are at the forefront of molecular theory and computation.

As Affiliate Professor of Chemistry with graduate faculty status, Dr. Xantheas is able to serve as a graduate advisor. Dr. Xantheas’ research facilities are located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory campus in Richland, WA.

For more information, please visit his faculty page, his PNNL staff page, or contact him directly via email at xantheas@uw.edu.

Deborah Wiegand promoted to Principal Lecturer

Wiegand 2013 cropThe Department of Chemistry congratulates Senior Lecturer Deborah Wiegand on her promotion to Principal Lecturer, effective September 16, 2016.

Dr. Wiegand joined the Department of Chemistry as Lecturer in 1990, and was promoted to Senior Lecturer in 1995. From 2001-2013, she served as Director of Academic Counseling and the UW Gateway Center and then as Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Academic Affairs, making wide-ranging contributions to student welfare and improving undergraduate services and education.

Dr. Wiegand returned to Chemistry full-time in 2013 as Senior Lecturer and Director of Entry-Level Programs. She regularly teaches courses in our introductory-level general chemistry sequence and serves as the sole instructor for our General, Organic, and Biochemistry sequence, which targets students preparing for the study of nursing. As Director of Entry-Level Programs, Dr. Wiegand leverages her previous administrative experience to provide critical leadership for our large introductory-level instructional programs. Her administrative contributions include leading a significant revision of our introductory-level general chemistry curriculum and the development of a placement test for introductory chemistry courses; when fully implemented, these will help us to better educate and serve the thousands of students who take our introductory-level courses each year.

Colleen Craig promoted to Senior Lecturer

Craig 2015 DTA photoThe Department of Chemistry congratulates Lecturer Colleen Craig on her promotion to Senior Lecturer, effective September 16, 2016.

Dr. Craig joined the regular faculty of the Department of Chemistry as Lecturer in Autumn 2012 after serving as an instructor for general chemistry courses since Autumn 2009. She typically teaches Introduction to General Chemistry and multiple courses in the introductory-level general chemistry sequence, and she contributes in-depth knowledge about online learning and assessment systems. For her efforts to incorporate innovative technology in the classroom to enhance student learning and engagement, Dr. Craig was one of four Chemistry team members to receive the 2015 Distinguished Teaching Award for Innovation with Technology.

Jasmine Bryant promoted to Senior Lecturer

Bryant Headshot_SquareThe Department of Chemistry congratulates Lecturer Jasmine Bryant on her promotion to Senior Lecturer, effective September 16, 2016.

Dr. Bryant joined the regular faculty of the Department of Chemistry as Lecturer in Autumn 2012, though she has previously contributed to the Department in both instructional and administrative capacities. She is unusually versatile as an instructor, successfully teaching large lecture courses in 100-level introductory general chemistry and 200-level sophomore organic chemistry, as well as 300-level inorganic chemistry lecture and laboratory courses. For her efforts to incorporate innovative technology in the classroom to enhance student learning and engagement, Dr. Bryant was one of four Chemistry team members to receive the 2015 Distinguished Teaching Award for Innovation with Technology.

 

David Masiello promoted to Associate Professor with Tenure

Masiello 2016The Department of Chemistry congratulates Assistant Professor David Masiello on his promotion to associate professor with tenure, effective September 16, 2016.

Research in Masiello group is aimed at building a theoretical understanding of nanoscale optical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal phenomena mediated by surface plasmons. Of particular interest is the fundamental science of light manipulation, especially in metamaterials capable of directing light towards desired pathways, such as optical-frequency magnetism, spatially-directed thermal patterning, room-temperature quantum information processing, and enhanced solar-energy conversion. Theoretical approaches from the Masiello group are currently being used by the experimental community to direct the design of advanced materials with unprecedented functionalities.

To learn more about Professor Masiello’s research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.

Gojko Lalic promoted to Associate Professor with Tenure

Lalic cropThe Department of Chemistry congratulates Assistant Professor Gojko Lalic on his promotion to associate professor with tenure, effective September 16, 2016.

Professor Lalic is interested in developing new reactions for the synthesis of organic molecules using transition metal catalysis. An essential part of the Lalic group’s approach to reaction development is the exploration of reaction mechanisms, which results in a better understanding of the fundamental reactivity of organic and organometallic compounds.

To learn more about Professor Lalic’s research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.

AJ Boydston promoted to Associate Professor with Tenure

Boydston 2015 DTA photoThe Department of Chemistry congratulates Assistant Professor AJ Boydston on his promotion to associate professor with tenure, effective September 16, 2016.

Research in the Boydston group focuses on various aspects of macromolecular design, synthesis, and function. By controlling the microstructures of polymer and network materials, the Boydston group is discovering ways in which macroscopic mechanical forces can be used to guide precise, molecular-level chemical transformations. Materials that display this mechanochemical transduction capability may find application in numerous fields, including biomedical engineering, drug delivery, additive manufacturing (3D printing), and autonomously self-healing systems.

To learn more about Professor Boydston’s research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.

Anne McCoy to join faculty

McCoy 2015 editWe are delighted to announce that Anne McCoy will be joining the Department as Professor of Chemistry for the 2015-16 academic year. Prof. McCoy is moving to the University of Washington from Ohio State University, where she has been on the faculty since 1994. Prof. McCoy is a leader in the area theoretical spectroscopy and dynamics. Her research focuses on the development of theoretical and computational approaches for understanding spectral signatures of large amplitude motions. She is particularly interested in molecules that are of atmospheric and astrochemical interest, and other species that exhibit large amplitude excursions from the minimum energy geometry even at low-levels of excitation.

Prof. McCoy is deputy editor of the Journal of Physical Chemistry A, and she previously served as senior editor of the Journal of Physical Chemistry. She is a member of the American Chemical Society’s Committee on Professional Training, which she chaired from 2012-2014. Prof. McCoy’s many honors include Ohio State University’s Distinguished Scholar Award and Arts & Sciences Distinguished Faculty Award, several named lectureships, and election as a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Chemical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

For more information about Prof. McCoy and her research, please visit her faculty page or contact her directly via email.

Alshakim Nelson to join faculty

Alshakim NelsonWe are delighted to announce that Dr. Alshakim Nelson will be joining the Department as Assistant Professor of Chemistry for the 2015-16 academic year. Dr. Nelson completed his undergraduate studies in chemistry at Pomona College in 1999. He received his Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of California at Los Angeles in 2004, where he studied carbohydrate-containing polymers and macrocycles with Professor J. Fraser Stoddart. He was then an NIH postdoctoral fellow at the California Institute of Technology working for Professor Robert Grubbs on olefin metathesis catalysts for the formation of supramolecular ensembles. Dr. Nelson joined IBM Almaden Research Center as a Research Staff Member in 2005, where he focused on synthesizing building blocks that enable large area nanomanufacturing via self-assembly. His research interests also include silicon-based polymers for lithographic applications, magnetic nanoparticles, directed self-assembly of nanoparticles, and hydrogen bonding block copolymers. Dr. Nelson has over 40 publications and 11 issued patents, and in 2011 he was designated as an IBM Master Inventor. In 2012, he became manager of the Nanomaterials Group, which includes the Synthetic Development Lab.

Dr. Nelson will begin his research program at the University of Washington in September 2015. His research will focus on the synthesis, characterization, and patterning of polymeric and supramolecular materials for the bio-interface.

For more information about Dr. Nelson and his research, please contact him directly via email.