Anne McCoy to join faculty

McCoy 2015 editWe are delighted to announce that Anne McCoy will be joining the Department as Professor of Chemistry for the 2015-16 academic year. Prof. McCoy is moving to the University of Washington from Ohio State University, where she has been on the faculty since 1994. Prof. McCoy is a leader in the area theoretical spectroscopy and dynamics. Her research focuses on the development of theoretical and computational approaches for understanding spectral signatures of large amplitude motions. She is particularly interested in molecules that are of atmospheric and astrochemical interest, and other species that exhibit large amplitude excursions from the minimum energy geometry even at low-levels of excitation.

Prof. McCoy is deputy editor of the Journal of Physical Chemistry A, and she previously served as senior editor of the Journal of Physical Chemistry. She is a member of the American Chemical Society’s Committee on Professional Training, which she chaired from 2012-2014. Prof. McCoy’s many honors include Ohio State University’s Distinguished Scholar Award and Arts & Sciences Distinguished Faculty Award, several named lectureships, and election as a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Chemical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

For more information about Prof. McCoy and her research, please visit her faculty page or contact her directly via email.

Alshakim Nelson to join faculty

Alshakim NelsonWe are delighted to announce that Dr. Alshakim Nelson will be joining the Department as Assistant Professor of Chemistry for the 2015-16 academic year. Dr. Nelson completed his undergraduate studies in chemistry at Pomona College in 1999. He received his Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of California at Los Angeles in 2004, where he studied carbohydrate-containing polymers and macrocycles with Professor J. Fraser Stoddart. He was then an NIH postdoctoral fellow at the California Institute of Technology working for Professor Robert Grubbs on olefin metathesis catalysts for the formation of supramolecular ensembles. Dr. Nelson joined IBM Almaden Research Center as a Research Staff Member in 2005, where he focused on synthesizing building blocks that enable large area nanomanufacturing via self-assembly. His research interests also include silicon-based polymers for lithographic applications, magnetic nanoparticles, directed self-assembly of nanoparticles, and hydrogen bonding block copolymers. Dr. Nelson has over 40 publications and 11 issued patents, and in 2011 he was designated as an IBM Master Inventor. In 2012, he became manager of the Nanomaterials Group, which includes the Synthetic Development Lab.

Dr. Nelson will begin his research program at the University of Washington in September 2015. His research will focus on the synthesis, characterization, and patterning of polymeric and supramolecular materials for the bio-interface.

For more information about Dr. Nelson and his research, please contact him directly via email.

Ashleigh Theberge to join faculty

Ashleigh Theberge PhotoWe are delighted to announce that Dr. Ashleigh Theberge will be joining the Department as Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Dr. Theberge completed her undergraduate studies in chemistry at Williams College, performing research with Professors Thomas Smith, Dieter Bingemann, Lois Banta, and Heather Stoll. She received her Ph.D. in chemistry with Professor Wilhelm Huck at the University of Cambridge in the field of droplet-based microfluidics. While pursuing her Ph.D., she was a visiting researcher at the Université de Strasbourg with Professor Andrew Griffiths, where she developed microfluidic methods for drug synthesis and screening. She completed her NIH postdoctoral fellowship with Professors David Beebe, William Ricke, and Wade Bushman at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, studying molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer using microscale culture and analysis platforms. She is presently an NIH K Award Scholar at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Dr. Theberge will launch her research program at the University of Washington in January 2016. Her research centers on the development and use of microfluidic technologies to understand the chemical signaling processes underlying disease, with a particular interest in steroid hormones in prostate disease and testis development and oxylipins involved in the immune response. She will develop new methods for microscale cell culture, small molecule isolation, and metabolomics.

For more information about Dr. Theberge and her research, please visit her faculty page or contact her directly via email.

Andrea Carroll promoted to Senior Lecturer

CarrollThe Department of Chemistry congratulates Lecturer Andrea Carroll on her promotion to Senior Lecturer, effective September 16, 2015.

Dr. Carroll joined the Department of Chemistry as a full-time lecturer in Fall 2011 after having been an instructor in the general chemistry course since Fall of 2009. She has served as the general chemistry laboratory instructor, as well, since Fall of 2006, guiding the laboratory portion of the general chemistry series for approximately 3,000 students each year.

Dan Fu to join faculty

FuWe are delighted to announce that Dr. Dan Fu will be joining the Department as Assistant Professor of Chemistry for the 2015-16 academic year. Dr. Fu completed his undergraduate studies in chemistry at Peking University. He earned his Ph.D. in chemistry with Professor Warren Warren at Princeton University, where he developed novel nonlinear absorption microscopy for visualizing non-fluorescent biomolecules and applied it to early melanoma diagnosis. Dr. Fu briefly conducted postdoctoral work on quantitative phase microscopy with the late Professor Michael Feld at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology before moving to his current postdoctoral position at Harvard University with Professor X. Sunney Xie. While at Harvard, Dr. Fu has focused on the development of multiplex and hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy, which he has applied to the study of biological problems such as lipid metabolism, drug transport, and cell growth.

Dr. Fu will launch his research program at the University of Washington in the summer of 2015. He will focus on the development of novel quantitative optical spectroscopy and imaging techniques to study the spatial-temporal dynamics of biomolecules in living biological cells and organisms, with an overarching goal of using analytical and physical chemistry approaches to explore the cellular mechanisms of complex diseases, develop early disease diagnosis tools, and establish effective drug screening processes.

For more information about Dr. Fu and his research, please visit his faculty page or contact him directly via email.

Dustin Maly promoted to Professor

MalyThe Department of Chemistry congratulates Associate Professor Dustin Maly on his promotion to Professor, effective September 16, 2015.

The Maly group is interested in developing new chemical tools that will allow a greater quantitative understanding of cellular signaling than is possible with currently available methods. Using the tools of organic synthesis they are generating cell permeable small molecules that allow the activation or inactivation of specific signaling enzymes in living cells.

To learn more about Professor Maly’s research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.

Xiaosong Li promoted to Professor

li150The Department of Chemistry congratulates Associate Professor Xiaosong Li on his promotion to Professor, effective September 16, 2015.

Research in the Li group focuses on the development of low-scaling methods to resolve excited state properties of many-electron systems, both in the time and frequency domains. This work is complimented by, and finds uses in, the development of efficient methods for studying non-adiabatic dynamics in large-scale systems.

To learn more about Professor Li’s research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.

Open tenure-track faculty positions in Chemistry

Applications are invited for full-time, tenure-track appointments in the Department of Chemistry. Outstanding candidates in all areas of chemistry and interdisciplinary areas involving chemistry will be considered for appointment at the Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor levels. We especially welcome applications in the areas of analytical, inorganic, and organic chemistry.

University of Washington faculty members engage in teaching, research, and service. Successful candidates will be expected to participate in undergraduate and graduate teaching and to develop innovative, vigorous, externally-funded research programs. Applicants must have a Ph.D. or domestic or foreign equivalent degree by date of appointment.

For information about the Department and to apply, please visit https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/4322; applications should include a cover letter, curriculum vitae, statement of future research interests, and (at the Assistant Professor rank) three letters of reference. Priority will be given to applications received by October 3, 2014. Please direct all inquiries or disability accommodation requests to search@chem.washington.edu.

The University of Washington is an affirmative action and equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to, among other things, race, religion, color, national origin, sex, age, status as protected veterans, or status as qualified individuals with disabilities.

Bo Zhang promoted to Associate Professor with Tenure

zhangThe Department of Chemistry congratulates Assistant Professor Bo Zhang on his promotion to associate professor with tenure, effective September 16, 2014.

Professor Zhang’s research focuses on the development and application of electroanalytical measurement tools to study single electrochemical events and processes. The Zhang group uses nanometer-scale electrodes to study electron transfer reactions of single molecules and single metal nanoparticles, electrocatalysis, and mass transport at the electrode/solution interface. This work is being conducted in pursuit of fundamental understanding of heterogeneous electron-transfer reactions and electrode/solution interfaces as well as single-cell chemistry and biological function such as neuronal secretion and brain activity.

To learn more about Professor Zhang’s research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.

Munira Khalil promoted to Associate Professor with Tenure

khalilThe Department of Chemistry congratulates Assistant Professor Munira Khalil on her promotion to associate professor with tenure, effective September 16, 2014.

Professor Khalil’s research focuses on the development and application of advanced spectroscopic techniques to understand the ultrafast structural dynamics of light-driven chemical and biological processes in solution. Using multidimensional infrared (IR) and ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopies, the Khalil group studies how coupled electron and vibrational motions and their interactions with the surrounding solvent dictate the course of ultrafast charge transfer reactions in chemical and biological systems. This work will ultimately provide fundamental understanding of molecular energetics and the dynamics of chemical reactions, with broad practical applications in the design of new materials and molecular devices.

To learn more about Professor Khalil’s research, please visit her faculty page and her research group website.