Nature Methods cover article details refined, accessible technique for expansion microscopy

dividing_finalCongratulations to Assistant Professor Joshua Vaughan and his UW co-workers, whose recent work was featured on the cover of Nature Methods. Their report details the development of a simplified method to “inflate” cellular structures for use in an imaging technique known as expansion microscopy.

Efforts to improve the resolution of cellular structures typically focus on addressing the limitations of microscope hardware. With expansion microscopy, higher resolution is achieved through physical alteration of the specimen. By linking swellable polymers to customized fluorophores, researchers can physically expand the specimen to enable super-resolution microscopy with a conventional laboratory microscope.

As noted in the journal, Vaughan and co-workers have “developed and characterized new methods for linking fluorophores to the polymer that now enable expansion microscopy with conventional fluorescently labeled antibodies and fluorescent proteins.” By simplifying the procedure and expanding fluorophore options, they came up with separate approaches to provide high resolution imaging of individual cells and of tissue slices. In addition to facilitating a range of biological studies, these refinements broadly expand access to the technique, enabling researchers to use a variety of conventional fluorophores and ordinary laboratory microscopes to achieve high resolution cellular imaging.

More information about this work can be found in Nature Methods and in the UW News press release.

For more information about Professor Vaughan and his research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.

AJ Boydston named a 2016 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar

Boydston 2015 DTA photoAssistant Professor AJ Boydston has been named a 2016 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar by The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation. The Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program supports the research and teaching careers of talented young faculty in the chemical sciences. Based on institutional nominations, the program provides discretionary funding to faculty at an early stage in their careers. Criteria for selection include an independent body of scholarship attained within the first five years of their appointment as independent researchers, and a demonstrated commitment to education, signaling the promise of continuing outstanding contributions to both research and teaching. The Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program provides an unrestricted research grant of $75,000.

To learn more about the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program, please visit the Dreyfus Foundation website. To learn more about Prof. Boydston, please visit his website and research group page.

Deborah Wiegand promoted to Principal Lecturer

Wiegand 2013 cropThe Department of Chemistry congratulates Senior Lecturer Deborah Wiegand on her promotion to Principal Lecturer, effective September 16, 2016.

Dr. Wiegand joined the Department of Chemistry as Lecturer in 1990, and was promoted to Senior Lecturer in 1995. From 2001-2013, she served as Director of Academic Counseling and the UW Gateway Center and then as Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Academic Affairs, making wide-ranging contributions to student welfare and improving undergraduate services and education.

Dr. Wiegand returned to Chemistry full-time in 2013 as Senior Lecturer and Director of Entry-Level Programs. She regularly teaches courses in our introductory-level general chemistry sequence and serves as the sole instructor for our General, Organic, and Biochemistry sequence, which targets students preparing for the study of nursing. As Director of Entry-Level Programs, Dr. Wiegand leverages her previous administrative experience to provide critical leadership for our large introductory-level instructional programs. Her administrative contributions include leading a significant revision of our introductory-level general chemistry curriculum and the development of a placement test for introductory chemistry courses; when fully implemented, these will help us to better educate and serve the thousands of students who take our introductory-level courses each year.

Colleen Craig promoted to Senior Lecturer

Craig 2015 DTA photoThe Department of Chemistry congratulates Lecturer Colleen Craig on her promotion to Senior Lecturer, effective September 16, 2016.

Dr. Craig joined the regular faculty of the Department of Chemistry as Lecturer in Autumn 2012 after serving as an instructor for general chemistry courses since Autumn 2009. She typically teaches Introduction to General Chemistry and multiple courses in the introductory-level general chemistry sequence, and she contributes in-depth knowledge about online learning and assessment systems. For her efforts to incorporate innovative technology in the classroom to enhance student learning and engagement, Dr. Craig was one of four Chemistry team members to receive the 2015 Distinguished Teaching Award for Innovation with Technology.

Jasmine Bryant promoted to Senior Lecturer

Bryant Headshot_SquareThe Department of Chemistry congratulates Lecturer Jasmine Bryant on her promotion to Senior Lecturer, effective September 16, 2016.

Dr. Bryant joined the regular faculty of the Department of Chemistry as Lecturer in Autumn 2012, though she has previously contributed to the Department in both instructional and administrative capacities. She is unusually versatile as an instructor, successfully teaching large lecture courses in 100-level introductory general chemistry and 200-level sophomore organic chemistry, as well as 300-level inorganic chemistry lecture and laboratory courses. For her efforts to incorporate innovative technology in the classroom to enhance student learning and engagement, Dr. Bryant was one of four Chemistry team members to receive the 2015 Distinguished Teaching Award for Innovation with Technology.

 

Robert Synovec wins 2016 Marcel Golay Award

synovec_2016Robert Synovec, Professor and Associate Chair for Graduate Education, is the recipient of the 2016 Marcel Golay Award. The Marcel Golay Award was created by PerkinElmer in honor of Marcel Jules Eduard Golay, the inventor of capillary columns. It is presented to a scientist in recognition of a lifetime of achievement in capillary chromatography. Prof. Synovec is being recognized for his “outstanding investigations in the areas of complex mixture analysis, multidimensional chromatography instrumentation design, and chemometrics uses for analytical separations.” The award will be given at the 40th International Symposium on Capillary Chromatography, in Riva del Garda, Italy, May 31- June 3, 2016.

To learn more about Professor Synovec and his research, visit his faculty page and research group site.

Brandi Cossairt Wins NSF CAREER Award

Brandi CossairtAssistant Professor Brandi Cossairt has received a CAREER (Faculty Early Career Development) Award from the National Science Foundation. The CAREER Program is a Foundation-wide program that “offers the National Science Foundation’s most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations.” Professor Cossairt received the award for her research proposal, “CAREER: New Models for Controlling InP Nucleation, Growth, and Luminescence using Magic-Sized Clusters and Targeted Surface Chemistry”. Research conducted under this CAREER award aims to address the fundamental challenges in controlling the composition and interfaces of nanomaterials with atom-level precision. Experimental approaches include:

1) testing new models of InP nucleation using isolable, structurally characterized and atomically precise magic-sized cluster intermediates;

2) understanding how surface chemistry impacts the structure and function of InP magic-sized clusters to gain access to general strategies for anisotropic shape control and doping; and

3) discovering new post-synthetic surface chemistry to turn-on and color-tune the luminescence of InP and related QDs using Lewis acid coordination chemistry.

Additionally, the project aims to advance educational goals, including creating an undergraduate specialization in Chemistry for Energy at the University of Washington (UW), developing hands-on demonstration materials and workshops on the topic of colloidal nanoscience targeted to middle and high school students in collaboration with the UW Phi Lambda Upsilon (National Chemistry Honor Society) chapter, and broadening participation in chemistry at the undergraduate, graduate and professional level through work with several organizations.

For more information about this NSF CAREER Award, please visit the award website.

For more information about Brandi Cossairt and her research program, please visit her faculty page and research group site.

David Masiello promoted to Associate Professor with Tenure

Masiello 2016The Department of Chemistry congratulates Assistant Professor David Masiello on his promotion to associate professor with tenure, effective September 16, 2016.

Research in Masiello group is aimed at building a theoretical understanding of nanoscale optical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal phenomena mediated by surface plasmons. Of particular interest is the fundamental science of light manipulation, especially in metamaterials capable of directing light towards desired pathways, such as optical-frequency magnetism, spatially-directed thermal patterning, room-temperature quantum information processing, and enhanced solar-energy conversion. Theoretical approaches from the Masiello group are currently being used by the experimental community to direct the design of advanced materials with unprecedented functionalities.

To learn more about Professor Masiello’s research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.

Gojko Lalic promoted to Associate Professor with Tenure

Lalic cropThe Department of Chemistry congratulates Assistant Professor Gojko Lalic on his promotion to associate professor with tenure, effective September 16, 2016.

Professor Lalic is interested in developing new reactions for the synthesis of organic molecules using transition metal catalysis. An essential part of the Lalic group’s approach to reaction development is the exploration of reaction mechanisms, which results in a better understanding of the fundamental reactivity of organic and organometallic compounds.

To learn more about Professor Lalic’s research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.

AJ Boydston promoted to Associate Professor with Tenure

Boydston 2015 DTA photoThe Department of Chemistry congratulates Assistant Professor AJ Boydston on his promotion to associate professor with tenure, effective September 16, 2016.

Research in the Boydston group focuses on various aspects of macromolecular design, synthesis, and function. By controlling the microstructures of polymer and network materials, the Boydston group is discovering ways in which macroscopic mechanical forces can be used to guide precise, molecular-level chemical transformations. Materials that display this mechanochemical transduction capability may find application in numerous fields, including biomedical engineering, drug delivery, additive manufacturing (3D printing), and autonomously self-healing systems.

To learn more about Professor Boydston’s research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.