Two Chemistry faculty elected to Washington State Academy of Sciences

WSAS 2013Chemistry Professor Charles Campbell and Chemical Engineering Professor Sam Jenekhe are among the 25 new members elected to the Washington State Academy of Sciences in recognition of their distinguished and continuing scientific achievements. The Washington State Academy of Sciences provides expert scientific and engineering analysis to inform public policy-making, and works to increase the role and visibility of science in the State of Washington. The new members, elected based on their achievements, were inducted during the academy’s sixth-annual meeting in Seattle and bring the academy’s total membership to 206.

Related link: http://www.washington.edu/news/2013/09/13/15-uw-faculty-members-named-to-state-academy-of-sciences/

For more information about Prof. Campbell and his research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.

For more information about Prof. Jenekhe and his research, please visit his faculty page.

New research published in Nature explores organic solar cells

A vial holds a solution that contains the UW-developed polymer “ink” that can be printed to make solar cells.

A vial holds a solution that contains the UW-developed polymer “ink” that can be printed to make solar cells.

David Ginger, Professor and Raymon E. and Rosellen M. Lawton Distinguished Scholar in Chemistry, and Alex Jen, Boeing/Johnson Chair Professor of Materials Science & Engineering, along with other researchers, have recently reported on the role of electron spin in creating efficient organic solar cells. Their findings were recently published in the journal Nature.

Organic solar cells that convert light to electricity using carbon-based molecules have shown promise as a versatile energy source but have not been able to match the efficiency of their silicon-based counterparts. These researchers have discovered a synthetic, high-performance polymer that behaves differently from other tested materials and could make inexpensive, highly efficient organic solar panels a reality. The polymer, created at the University of Washington and tested at the University of Cambridge in England, appears to improve efficiency by wringing electrical current from pathways that, in other materials, cause a loss of electrical charge.

More information can be found at Nature and in the UW News press release.

To learn more about Professor Ginger and Professor Jen, please visit their research group websites.

Ginger Research Group: http://depts.washington.edu/gingerlb/

Jen Research Group: http://depts.washington.edu/jengroup/

Karen Goldberg appointed as a UW Presidential Entrepreneurial Faculty Fellow

GoldbergKaren Goldberg, Nicole A. Boand Endowed Professor of Chemistry and Director of the Center for Enabling New Technologies through Catalysis, is one of eight UW professors appointed as Presidential Entrepreneurial Faculty Fellows. Entrepreneurial Faculty Fellows are selected for their success in initiating groundbreaking programs to translate research into products and therapies, in collaborating with industry, and in sharing their knowledge with other UW researchers.

Throughout their two-year terms the eight new fellows will serve as mentors to other UW faculty, researchers and staff with entrepreneurial aspirations, and also share their experiences at campus entrepreneurial events. At the end of the term, fellows are encouraged to continue participation in the program and to serve as program and activity advisors to the UW Center for Commercialization (C4C).

More information about the Entrepreneurial Faculty Fellows Program can be found at the C4C website.

To learn more about Professor Goldberg, visit her faculty page and her research group site.