Forrest Michael promoted to Associate Professor with tenure

The Department of Chemistry congratulates Forrest Michael on his promotion to associate professor with tenure. Prof. Michael’s research is focused on developing new methodologies for difficult transformations in organic synthesis. These types of difficult transformations include the direct addition of N-H bonds to unactivated alkenes, the use of non-metal catalysts for the synthesis of biologically active molecules, and catalytic processes with a high level of stereocontrol.

To learn more about Prof. Michael’s research, please visit his faculty page.

Andrew Boydston to join faculty as Assistant Professor

We are delighted to welcome Dr. Andrew Boydston to the Department of Chemistry. Dr. Boydston is an expert in the field of organic synthesis, polymer science, and materials chemistry.

Dr. Boydston received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Oregon where he did research with Professor Michael M. Haley, and later earned his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin in 2007 under the direction of Professor Christopher W. Bielawski. Dr. Boydston is currently a postdoctoral research associate with Professor Robert H. Grubbs at the California Institute of Technology, where his work currently focuses on nanostructures based on cyclic polymer topologies.

Dr. Boydston will begin his research program here in July, focusing on the design, synthesis, and application of functional organic materials and the development of new reaction methodology. For more information, please visit his  faculty page and his research group website, or contact him directly via email at boydston@chem.washington.edu.

Champak Chatterjee to join faculty as Assistant Professor

We are delighted to welcome Dr. Champak Chatterjee to the Department of Chemistry. Dr. Chatterjee is an expert in the field of synthetic protein chemistry and biochemistry.

Dr. Chatterjee received his M.S. degree from the Indian Institute of Technology in Bombay, where he did research with Professor Sambasivarao Kotha, and earned his Ph.D. in 2005 with Professor Wilfred van der Donk at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Chatterjee is currently a postdoctoral research associate in the Ruben Laboratory of Synthetic Protein Chemistry at The Rockefeller University, where he is investigating the mechanism of cross-talk between histone ubiquitylation and histone methylation with Professor Tom Muir.

Dr. Chatterjee will begin his research program here in July, using a combination of synthetic protein chemistry, protein engineering, and molecular and cell biology to interrogate the mechanisms underlying the regulation of protein function by ubiquitin-like proteins. For more information, please visit his  faculty page or contact him directly via email at chatterjee@chem.washington.edu.

David Masiello to join faculty as Assistant Professor

We are delighted to welcome Dr. David Masiello to the Department of Chemistry. Dr. Masiello specializes in the many-body theory of atomic and molecular systems and their interaction with the electromagnetic field.

Dr. Masiello received both his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Florida, earning his Ph.D. in Chemical Physics in 2004 with Professor Yngve Ohrn. After two years as a postdoctoral research associate with Professor William Reinhardt here at the University of Washington, Dr. Masiello moved to Northwestern University to study the first-principles theory of molecular spectroscopy and optics on the nanoscale with Professor George Schatz. Dr. Masiello is currently serving as a lecturer at the University of Washington, and will be teaching physical chemistry this spring quarter.

Dr. Masiello will begin his research program here in June, with a focus on the fundamental theory of a variety of plasmon-enhanced molecular processes from linear and nonlinear spectroscopy and molecular sensing, to charge transfer in condensed-phase environments with application to enhanced solar energy conversion. For more information, please visit his  faculty page or his research group website, or contact him directly via email at masiello@chem.washington.edu.

David Ginger promoted to Full Professor

Prof. David GingerThe Department of Chemistry congratulates Associate Professor David Ginger on his promotion to the rank of Professor, effective September 16, 2010. David Ginger studies the physical chemistry of nanostructured materials with potential applications in low-cost photovoltaics (solar cells that convert sunlight directly to electricity), energy efficient light-emitting diodes, and novel biosensors.  His group studies conjugated polymers, semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots, and plasmon resonant metal nanoparticles using both scanning probe microscopy and optical spectroscopy.  His group is known for pioneering the development and application of scanning probe microscopy methods to understand how to improve nanostructured solar cells.  For instance, by using a sharp metal probe to collect current from very small regions of a solar cell they can determine which regions give the most photocurrent–and which don’t.  These experiments can be used to improve the manufacturing of thin film solar cells and to test basic theories of charge transport in disordered materials.

For more information about David Ginger and his research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.