Matthew Bush selected to receive 2014 Eli Lilly Young Investigator Award in Analytical Chemistry

matt_bushAssistant Professor Matthew F. Bush has been selected to receive the 2014 Eli Lilly and Company Young Investigator Award in Analytical Chemistry. The award is given by the Analytical Chemistry Academic Contacts Committee at Eli Lilly and Company based upon Dr. Bush’s outstanding research, publication record, and the impact they feel he is making in the field of analytical chemistry.

Eli Lilly awards these grants in many fields of chemistry and the life sciences to new, outstanding faculty members at universities throughout the country with the aim to strengthen ties with the academic community and, at the same time, provide support for leading scientists in analytical chemistry.

For more information about Matthew Bush and his research program, please visit his faculty page.

AJ Boydston wins NSF Career Award

boydstonAssistant Professor AJ Boydston has received a CAREER (Faculty Early Career Development) Award from the National Science Foundation. The CAREER Program is a Foundation-wide program that “offers the National Science Foundation’s most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations.” Professor Boydston received the award for his research proposal, “CAREER: Development of Force-Activated Materials for the Release of Small Organic Molecules”. This award funds research to develop materials capable of releasing small organic molecules via mechanochemical transduction. In this way, macroscopic forces will be translated into molecular-level chemical reactions. In particular, Professor Boydston will be:

  1. Investigating how mechanical force can be used to guide chemical reactivities. This will include comparisons between mechanophores that operate by complementary bond bending and stretching mechanisms.
  2. Developing mechanochemical triggers for initiating head-to-tail depolymerization of self-immolative polymers.
  3. Establishing design principles for materials that most efficiently convert mechanical input into chemical output.

In addition to providing new insights and capabilities for functional materials, Professor Boydston maintains an active commitment to STEM education through interactions with various on-campus organizations and curriculum development with Sammamish High School.

For more information about this NSF CAREER Award, please visit the award website.

For more information about AJ Boydston and his research program, please visit his faculty page.

Alvin Kwiram elected to the Washington State Academy of Sciences

Alvin KwiramEmeritus Professor Alvin Kwiram is among the 18 new members elected to the Washington State Academy of Sciences in recognition of their “outstanding record of scientific achievement and willingness to work on behalf of the Academy in bringing the best available science to bear on issues within the State of Washington.” The Washington State Academy of Sciences provides expert scientific and engineering analysis to inform public policy-making, and works to increase the role and visibility of science in the State of Washington. The new members, elected based on their achievements, will be inducted during the academy’s seventh annual meeting at the Seattle Museum of Flight on September 18, 2014. Thew newly elected members bring the academy’s total membership to 221.

WSAS Press Release: 18 New Members Elected by Science Academy

For more information about Professor Kwiram and his research, please visit his faculty page.

Gary Christian named 2014 ACS Fellow

gary3 squareEmeritus Professor Gary Christian has been named a 2014 Fellow of the American Chemical Society. This honor is bestowed upon scientists “who have demonstrated outstanding accomplishments in chemistry and made important contributions to the American Chemical Society.” Professor Christian will be recognized at an induction ceremony during the 248th ACS National Meeting in San Francisco, CA in August 2014. A full list of 2014 ACS Fellows was published in Chemical & Engineering News.

The ACS Fellows Program was created by the ACS Board of Directors in December 2008 “to recognize members of ACS for outstanding achievements in and contributions to science, the profession, and the Society.” Fellows come from academe, industry, and government. More information about the ACS Fellows Program, including a complete list of all ACS Fellows, is available on the ACS Fellows website.

For more information about Professor Christian and his research, please visit his faculty page.

Sam Jenekhe receives the 2014 AIChE Charles M. A. Stine Award

jenekhe150_2Sam Jenekhe, Professor of Chemistry and Boeing-Martin Professor of Chemical Engineering, is the recipient of the 2014 Charles M. A. Stine Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE). The award recognizes Professor Jenekhe for outstanding and pioneering contributions to the development of semiconducting polymers for applications in organic electronics and optoelectronics. The award is given annually to a leading researcher in recognition of outstanding contributions to the field of materials science and engineering and is sponsored by E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co. Professor Jenekhe will present the keynote talk in the MESD Plenary Session at the 2014 AIChE Annual Meeting in Atlanta.

More information on the Charles M. A. Stine award can be found here.

For more information about Professor Jenekhe and his research, please visit his faculty page.

Benjamin Van Kuiken wins College of Arts and Science Dean’s Graduate Medal

BVK Picture_sqCongratulations to Benjamin Van Kuiken for his accomplishments earning the College of Arts and Science Dean’s Graduate Medal in Natural Sciences. Benjamin is a graduate student in Assistant Professor Munira Khalil’s laboratory. The Dean’s Graduate Medal is awarded to four exceptional graduate students – one in each division of the College of Arts and Sciences – representing Arts, Humanities, Natural Science, and Social Sciences.

Munira Khalil selected for 2014 Journal of Physical Chemistry B Lectureship

khalilAssistant Professor Munira Khalil has been named one of the 2014 Journal of Physical Chemistry lecturers by the Physical Chemistry Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS). Lecturers will present their work at a special symposium at the Fall ACS National Meeting in San Francisco (August 10-14, 2014). The lectureships were established to recognize the contributions of young investigators who have made major impacts on the field of physical chemistry related to research areas published in the Journals of Physical Chemistry; Professor Khalil’s lectureship is for the Journal of Physical Chemistry B covering biophysical chemistry, biomaterials, liquids, and soft matter.

To learn more about this award, please see the ACS lectureship announcement. To learn more about Professor Khalil’s research, visit her faculty page and her research group site.

AJ Boydston named a 2014 Cottrell Scholar

boydstonAJ Boydston, University of Washington assistant professor of chemistry, has been selected as one of 12 Cottrell Scholar Awardees for 2014. The awards are presented by the Research Corporation for Science Advancement (RCSA) to early career faculty who are committed to excel at both research and teaching. RCSA Interim President Jack Pladziewicz, notes, “It may well be that not all research faculty can do this simultaneously and early in their careers, but the very best can.” Previous awardees from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Washington include Professors David Ginger, Daniel Gamelin, Sarah Keller, and Phil Reid.

Boydston’s research group is developing synthetic materials capable of mechanochemical transduction. They have recently reported “flex activated” mechanophores, which are capable of converting mechanical input into chemical output via force-guided changes in molecular-level geometry. Boydston has also been active in redesigning his introductory organic chemistry course to help undergraduate students learn how to apply concepts and develop problem-solving strategies, similar to how experts in the field approach their research.  The Cottrell Scholar Award, which provides $75,000 in funding, will help support Boydston’s ongoing research and teaching efforts.

For more information about the Cottrell Scholars Award, visit their announcement page. More more information about Prof. Boydston’s research, visit his research page.

Matthew Bush named Sloan Research Fellow

matt_bushMatthew Bush, University of Washington assistant professor of chemistry, has been selected as one of 126 Sloan Research Fellows for 2014. The fellowships are given to early-career scientists and scholars whose achievements and potential identify them as rising stars, according to the announcement Feb. 18 by the Sloan Foundation. Fellows receive $50,000 to further their research.

Bush leads a lab that develops mass spectrometry-based technologies to study the structures, assembly and dynamics of protein complexes. His group applies these approaches to a wide range of biological systems including those involved in bacterial secretion, regulating protein degradation and protein maintenance. Bush, whose bachelor’s degree is from Carleton College, Minn., and doctorate from the University of California Berkeley, did post-doctoral research at the University of Cambridge and then the University of Oxford. He joined the UW in 2011.

See this UW News original article (by Sandra Hines) here.

Sarah Keller receives Thomas E. Thompson Award

kellerSarah Keller has received the Thomas E. Thompson Award from the Biophysical Society. The Thomas E. Thompson Award recognizes an outstanding contribution in the field of membrane structure and assembly. Professor Keller received the award for her “contributions to our understanding of the lateral segregation of lipids into domains in membranes.” The award will be presented at the Membrane Structure & Assembly Subgroup 2014 Symposium on Saturday, February 15, 2014 in San Francisco, California.

For more information, see: http://www.biophysics.org/2014meeting/Program/Subgroups/MembraneStructureAssembly/tabid/4254/Default.aspx

To learn more about Professor Keller, visit her faculty page and research group page.