Lecturer Openings in General and Introductory Organic Chemistry

We are looking to fill full-time Lecturer positions in general chemistry and introductory organic chemistry.

GENERAL CHEMISTRY: The Department of Chemistry at the University of Washington seeks one or more full-time, 9-month, non-tenure-track Lecturers for appointment on or after September 16, 2012 to participate in our undergraduate chemistry instructional program with an emphasis on general chemistry courses. We anticipate an initial one- to three-year appointment, depending upon past experience, with the possibility of renewals. The position requires a Ph.D. in chemistry or a closely related field. Preference will be given to candidates who have demonstrated excellence in large general chemistry lectures, laboratory instruction, and course development. Candidates with past experience in or background suitable for teaching introductory organic chemistry courses are encouraged to so indicate. Applicants should submit a cover letter stating qualifications, a curriculum vitae, a brief statement of teaching philosophy and experience, and three letters of recommendation online at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/1579.

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY: The Department of Chemistry at the University of Washington seeks one or more full-time, 9-month, non-tenure-track Lecturers for appointment on or after September 16, 2012 to participate in our undergraduate chemistry instructional program with an emphasis on introductory organic chemistry courses. We anticipate an initial one- to three-year appointment, depending upon past experience, with the possibility of renewals. The position requires a Ph.D. in chemistry or a closely related field. Preference will be given to candidates who have demonstrated excellence in large introductory organic chemistry lectures, laboratory instruction, and course development. Candidates with past experience in or background suitable for teaching general chemistry courses are encouraged to so indicate. Applicants should submit a cover letter stating qualifications, a curriculum vitae, a brief statement of teaching philosophy and experience, and three letters of recommendation online at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/1581.

Please direct all other correspondence to lecturer@chem.washington.edu. Review of applications will begin August 15, 2012; applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

University of Washington faculty members engage in teaching, research, and service. The University of Washington is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer. The University is building a culturally diverse faculty and strongly encourages applications from women, minorities, and individuals with disabilities.

Brandi Cossairt to join faculty

We are delighted to welcome Dr. Brandi Cossairt to the Department of Chemistry. Dr. Cossairt did her undergraduate work at Caltech, performing research with Professors Jesse L. Beauchamp and Jonas C. Peters. She received her Ph.D. from MIT, where she investigated the niobium-mediated synthesis of phosphorus-rich molecules under the direction of Professor Christopher C. Cummins. She is currently an NIH postdoctoral fellow with Assistant Professor Jonathan Owen at Columbia University, where she has developed new methods to synthesize ultrasmall (sub-2 nm) metal chalcogenide (CdSe, CdS, PbSe, PbS) nanoparticles. She also participates as an active member of Columbia’s Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC), “Redefining Photovoltaic Efficiency through Molecular Scale Control.”

Dr. Cossairt will begin her research program here in July. Her work will focus on new methods for the preparation of III-V semiconductor clusters and nanoparticles for solar energy applications, and the development of novel bifunctional catalyst systems incorporating both highly reducing early transition metal complexes and binary semiconducting clusters and nanoparticles.

For more information, please visit her faculty page or contact her directly via email at cossairt@chem.washington.edu.

Two New Lecturers in Chemistry

We are delighted to welcome Dr. Jasmine Bryant and Dr. Colleen Craig to the Department of Chemistry as new lecturers. Enrollment in the chemistry courses is at an all-time high. As a result, the Department of Chemistry conducted a national search for additional instructional staff to ensure students have access to chemistry courses.

Dr. Bryant received her undergraduate degree in chemistry from the California Institute of Technology, her Master’s in Teaching from Seattle University, and her PhD in inorganic chemistry at the University of Washington, working with Prof. James Mayer. She has been at the UW in several roles since 2002, most recently as the Director of Communications for the Center for Enabling New Technologies through Catalysis and as a temporary instructor in general chemistry and inorganic chemistry.

Dr. Craig received her undergraduate degree at the University of Colorado, Denver Campus, and her PhD in physical chemistry at the University of Washington, working with Prof. Oleg Prezhdo. She has taught general chemistry classes at UW as a temporary instructor for the past two years, as well as at Seattle Central Community College for three years starting in 2008. Since spring 2011, Dr. Craig has worked with UW in the High School to develop a version of CHEM 110 (Introduction to General Chemistry) for delivery in Washington State high schools. In addition to teaching, Dr. Craig has also worked as a content developer for WH Freeman, and has participated in several chemistry advisory boards, including for McGraw Hill and WebAssign.

Drs. Bryant and Craig join Dr. Andrea Carroll (below) as lecturers.

Xiaosong Li Promoted to Associate Professor with Tenure

The Department of Chemistry congratulates Assistant Professor Xiaosong Li on his promotion to associate professor with tenure. Professor Li’s research is focused on developing and applying electronic structure theories and ab initio molecular dynamics for studying properties and reactions, in particular non-adiabatic reactions that take place in large systems, such as polymers, biomolecules, and clusters.

To learn more about Professor Li’s research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.

Dustin Maly Promoted to Associate Professor with Tenure

The Department of Chemistry congratulates Assistant Professor Dustin Maly on his promotion to associate professor with tenure. Professor Maly’s research aims to understand the enzyme families that are involved in cellular signal transduction. The final goal of these studies is to identify new molecular targets for the treatment of human disease. Professor Maly’s research group integrates techniques from organic chemistry, biochemistry, structural biology, proteomics, and cell biology to develop new tools that provide a greater understanding of diverse signaling processes.

To learn more about Professor Maly’s research, please visit his faculty page or his research group website.

Andrew Boydston to join faculty as Assistant Professor

We are delighted to welcome Dr. Andrew Boydston to the Department of Chemistry. Dr. Boydston is an expert in the field of organic synthesis, polymer science, and materials chemistry.

Dr. Boydston received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Oregon where he did research with Professor Michael M. Haley, and later earned his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin in 2007 under the direction of Professor Christopher W. Bielawski. Dr. Boydston is currently a postdoctoral research associate with Professor Robert H. Grubbs at the California Institute of Technology, where his work currently focuses on nanostructures based on cyclic polymer topologies.

Dr. Boydston will begin his research program here in July, focusing on the design, synthesis, and application of functional organic materials and the development of new reaction methodology. For more information, please visit his  faculty page and his research group website, or contact him directly via email at boydston@chem.washington.edu.

Champak Chatterjee to join faculty as Assistant Professor

We are delighted to welcome Dr. Champak Chatterjee to the Department of Chemistry. Dr. Chatterjee is an expert in the field of synthetic protein chemistry and biochemistry.

Dr. Chatterjee received his M.S. degree from the Indian Institute of Technology in Bombay, where he did research with Professor Sambasivarao Kotha, and earned his Ph.D. in 2005 with Professor Wilfred van der Donk at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Chatterjee is currently a postdoctoral research associate in the Ruben Laboratory of Synthetic Protein Chemistry at The Rockefeller University, where he is investigating the mechanism of cross-talk between histone ubiquitylation and histone methylation with Professor Tom Muir.

Dr. Chatterjee will begin his research program here in July, using a combination of synthetic protein chemistry, protein engineering, and molecular and cell biology to interrogate the mechanisms underlying the regulation of protein function by ubiquitin-like proteins. For more information, please visit his  faculty page or contact him directly via email at chatterjee@chem.washington.edu.

David Masiello to join faculty as Assistant Professor

We are delighted to welcome Dr. David Masiello to the Department of Chemistry. Dr. Masiello specializes in the many-body theory of atomic and molecular systems and their interaction with the electromagnetic field.

Dr. Masiello received both his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Florida, earning his Ph.D. in Chemical Physics in 2004 with Professor Yngve Ohrn. After two years as a postdoctoral research associate with Professor William Reinhardt here at the University of Washington, Dr. Masiello moved to Northwestern University to study the first-principles theory of molecular spectroscopy and optics on the nanoscale with Professor George Schatz. Dr. Masiello is currently serving as a lecturer at the University of Washington, and will be teaching physical chemistry this spring quarter.

Dr. Masiello will begin his research program here in June, with a focus on the fundamental theory of a variety of plasmon-enhanced molecular processes from linear and nonlinear spectroscopy and molecular sensing, to charge transfer in condensed-phase environments with application to enhanced solar energy conversion. For more information, please visit his  faculty page or his research group website, or contact him directly via email at masiello@chem.washington.edu.

David Ginger promoted to Full Professor

Prof. David GingerThe Department of Chemistry congratulates Associate Professor David Ginger on his promotion to the rank of Professor, effective September 16, 2010. David Ginger studies the physical chemistry of nanostructured materials with potential applications in low-cost photovoltaics (solar cells that convert sunlight directly to electricity), energy efficient light-emitting diodes, and novel biosensors.  His group studies conjugated polymers, semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots, and plasmon resonant metal nanoparticles using both scanning probe microscopy and optical spectroscopy.  His group is known for pioneering the development and application of scanning probe microscopy methods to understand how to improve nanostructured solar cells.  For instance, by using a sharp metal probe to collect current from very small regions of a solar cell they can determine which regions give the most photocurrent–and which don’t.  These experiments can be used to improve the manufacturing of thin film solar cells and to test basic theories of charge transport in disordered materials.

For more information about David Ginger and his research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.