Gojko Lalic wins NSF CAREER Award

lalicAssistant Professor Gojko Lalic has received a CAREER (Faculty Early Career Development) Award from the National Science Foundation. The CAREER Program is a Foundation-wide program that “offers the National Science Foundation’s most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations.” Prof. Lalic received the award for his research proposal, “CAREER: Catalytic Methods for Hydrofunctionalization of Unsaturated Compounds”. The award funds research that will investigate new general strategies for the hydrofunctionalization of unsaturated compounds using transition metal catalysis. In particular, Prof. Lalic will be:

  1. Investigating the highly selective copper-catalyzed reduction of alkynes to alkenes – a method that avoids common side reactions such as over-reduction and alkene isomerization.
  2. Studying the copper-catalyzed anti-Markovnikov hydrobromination reactions of terminal alkynes for the preparation of alkenyl bromides. These provide valuable alternatives to stoichiometric methods currently used for the synthesis of this class of compounds.
  3. Investigating the synthesis of Z- and E-alkenes via the hydroalkylation of alkynes.
  4. Studying a new general approach to the asymmetric synthesis of quaternary stereocenters based on gold-catalyzed hydrofunctionalization of chiral allenes. Using this approach, new methods for the synthesis of enantioenriched      tetrahydrofurans, tetrahydropyrans, chromans, pyrroles, piperidines, and a variety of carbocyles containing quaternary stereocenters are under investigation.

In addition to providing valuable tools for organic synthesis, Prof. Lalic is active in promoting STEM education at two local high schools by contributing to guest lectures and participating in school science fairs and Seattle-area science exhibits.

For more information about this NSF CAREER Award, please visit the award website.

For more information about Gojko Lalic and his research program, please visit his faculty page and his research group page.

Chemistry graduate students awarded NSF Graduate Research Fellowships

GRFP_logoFive graduate students working in the Department of Chemistry were awarded National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships, with four additional students receiving an honorable mention. The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based master’s and doctoral degrees at accredited U.S. institutions.

NSF Graduate Research Fellowship recipients:
Kimberly Hartstein, Gamelin Research Group
Heidi Nelson, Gamelin Research Group
Dana Sulas, Ginger Research Group
Niket Thakkar (Applied Math), Masiello Research Group
Caroline Weller, Chatterjee, Research Group

Honorable Mention:
Jonathan Goldberg, Heinekey and Goldberg Research Groups
Stephanie Hemmingson, Campbell Research Group
Patrick Lestrange, Li Research Group
Sarah Vorpahl, Ginger Research Group

Congratulations!

For more information, visit:

NSF GRFP Awards and Honorable Mentions: https://www.fastlane.nsf.gov/grfp/AwardeeList.do?method=loadAwardeeList

NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program: http://www.nsfgrfp.org/

Robert Synovec wins GCxGC Scientific Achievement Award

SynovecProfessor Robert E. Synovec has been awarded the GCxGC Scientific Achievement Award. He presented a plenary lecture and received his award at the 10th International GCxGC Symposium in May 2013. The GCxGC Scientific Achievement Award recognizes the pioneering contributions of key scientists in promoting two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) instrumentation, software, and method development and/or applications. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography is an analytical technique ideally applicable to the separation of complex samples of volatile and semi-volatile compounds. Professor Synovec and his research group have made significant contributions to this emerging technology since 1998.

To learn more about Professor Synovec’s research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.

Munira Khalil named a 2013 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar

khalilAssistant Professor Munira Khalil has been named a 2013 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar by The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation. The Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program supports the research and teaching careers of talented young faculty in the chemical sciences. Based on institutional nominations, the program provides discretionary funding to faculty at an early stage in their careers. Criteria for selection include an independent body of scholarship attained within the first five years of their appointment as independent researchers, and a demonstrated commitment to education, signaling the promise of continuing outstanding contributions to both research and teaching. The Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program provides an unrestricted research grant of $75,000.

To learn more about the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program, please visit the Dreyfus Foundation website. To learn more about Prof. Khalil, please visit her website and research group page.

David Masiello selected for the ACS Outstanding Junior Faculty Award in Computational Chemistry

MasielloThe Computers in Chemistry Division of the American
Chemical Society has awarded Assistant Professor David Masiello the ACS COMP OpenEye Outstanding Junior Faculty Award. His work will be presented at the 2013 Fall ACS meeting in Indianapolis and is titled “Elucidating the
Signatures of Fano Interferences in Electron Energy-Loss and Cathodoluminescence Spectroscopies via Multiscale Electrodynamics Simulations”. The award is presented to up to four outstanding tenure-track junior faculty members based on the novelty and importance of their research. The award aims to assist new faculty members in gaining visibility within the computers in chemistry community.

To learn more about Professor Masiello and his research, please visit his faculty page and research group site.

Karen Goldberg receives Hopkins Faculty Award

GoldbergProfessor Karen Goldberg, Nicole A. Boand Endowed Professor of Chemistry and Director of the Center for Enabling New Technologies through Catalysis received the 2012 Hopkins Award and, on March 15, delivered the award lecture titled “Collaboration in Chemistry: Growing the Center for Enabling New Technologies through Catalysis (CENTC), the first NSF Center for Chemical Innovation”. The presentation described Professor Goldberg’s experiences transitioning from a primarily sole-investigator research program to becoming a part of a large-scale multi-investigator collaborative effort to solve big problems in chemistry.

The Paul B. Hopkins Endowed Faculty Award is awarded to a member of the Department of Chemistry faculty to honor outstanding achievement in any area of professional responsibility. The award was established through an endowment from Emeritus Professor B. S. Rabinovitch and awardees are selected by a committee of faculty members.  Unlike typical awards, usually given by professional societies or within specific fields of chemistry, the Hopkins Award is given by UW Chemistry faculty to their colleagues for outstanding achievement.  Previous Hopkins Award recipients are: James M. Mayer, Frantisek Tureček, Charles T. Campbell, and Alvin L. Kwiram.

Bo Zhang receives SEAC 2013 Young Investigator Award

The Society for Electroanalytical Chemistry has awarded the 2013 Young Investigator Award to Assistant Professor Bo Zhang. The SEAC Young Investigator Award, sponsored by Thermo Fisher Scientific, is awarded to researchers within ten years of obtaining their Ph.D. It is considered one of the highest honors for a young electroanalytical chemist in the US. The award will be presented at PittCon 2013, held March 17-21 in Philadelphia with a symposium highlighting new investogators in electrochemistry and electroanalysis. More information about the award and upcoming conference can be found in the current issue of SEAC Communications.

For more information about Professor Zhang and his research, please visit his faculty page or his research group website.

Sarah Keller receives Mentor Award from UW Postdoctoral Association

Sarah Keller, professor of chemistry, adjunct professor of physics, and associate dean for research activities in the College of Arts and Sciences, has received the 2012 Mentor Award from the University of Washington Postdoctoral Association. The annual award, based on nominations from current and former postdocs, “recognizes one faculty member who provides extraordinary postdoctoral mentorship by demonstrating leadership, understanding, concern for professional development, encouragement, integrity, and dedication.” Keller also has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

For more information about Professor Keller and her research, please visit her faculty page or research group website.

David Masiello receives NSF CAREER Award

Assistant Professor David Masiello has received a CAREER (Faculty Early Career Development) Award from the National Science Foundation. The NSF CAREER Program is a Foundation-wide program that “offers the National Science Foundation’s most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations.” Professor Masiello received the award for his research proposal, “CAREER: Elucidating Light-Matter Interactions on the Nanoscale Using Quantum Many-Body Theory and the Electrodynamics of Swift Electrons.” In particular, the award funds research that will:

1) Establish a first-principles, multiscale theoretical framework capable of rigorously describing the severe deformations of a molecule’s electronic structure when coupled strongly to a plasmonic environment, described by continuum electrodynamics;

2) Numerically implement the electrodynamics of a swift electron and its interactions with a complex nanoscopic environment to characterize the relationship between electron and photon-driven plasmonic excitations and their associated nanophotonic properties;

3) Correlate electron- and photon-excitation sources to learn about the redistribution of energy between near- and far-field and nanoconfined heat in plasmonically active metal nanostructures in the presence of quantum emitters/absorbers, with an emphasis on the achieving high spatial and spectral resolution.

For more information about this NSF CAREER Award, please visit the award website.

For more information about Professor Masiello and his research, please visit his faculty page or his research group website.

Four Faculty Members Elected Fellows of AAAS

Four faculty members from the Department of Chemistry were among the 701 newly elected Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as a Fellow of the AAAS is an honor bestowed upon members of the organization by their peers. The newly elected AAAS Fellows will be recognized for their contributions to science and technology at the Fellows Forum on February 16, 2013 during the AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts.

Eleven University of Washington researchers were among the 701 AAAS Fellows elected in 2012, including the following four from the Department of Chemistry:

David S. Ginger, Professor and Raymon E. and Rosellen M. Lawton Distinguished Scholar in Chemistry

D. Michael Heinekey, Professor of Chemistry

Sarah L. Keller, Professor of Chemistry and Associate Dean for Research Activities

František Tureček, Professor of Chemistry

For additional coverage of the UW researchers receiving this honor, please see the UW News article.