Clean Energy Institute Launches

CleanEnergyInstKickoff_sqA new University of Washington institute to develop efficient, cost-effective solar power and better energy storage systems launched December 12 with an event attended by UW President Michael K. Young, Gov. Jay Inslee and researchers, industry experts and policy leaders in renewable energy.

The Clean Energy Institute formed when Washington’s governor and state legislators last summer allocated $6 million to create a research center at the university that will advance solar energy and electrical energy storage capacities. The institute will better connect and boost existing energy research at the UW as well as attract new partnerships and talent, including new faculty members.

The opening of the Clean Energy Institute was covered by KIRO 7 News, the Seattle Times, and UW News. Chemistry Professor David Ginger, Raymon E. and Rosellen M. Lawton Distinguished Scholar in Chemistry, is the Associate Director of the Clean Energy Institute.  Daniel Gamelin, Harry and Catherine Jaynne Boand Endowed Professor of Chemistry, serves on the Faculty Advisory Board.

Daniel Gamelin receives 2012 Inorganic Nanoscience Award

Daniel Gamelin, the Harry and Catherine Jaynne Boand Endowed Professor of Chemistry, received the 2012 Inorganic Nanoscience Award from the American Chemical Society’s Division of Inorganic Chemistry. The award, sponsored by the University of South Carolina NanoCenter, is meant to recognize sustained excellence, dedication, and perseverance in research in the area of inorganic nanoscience. It will be presented at the 2012 Fall ACS meeting in Philadelphia during a half-day symposium honoring Professor Gamelin.

 

To learn more about Professor Gamelin and his research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.

Four Faculty Members Elected Fellows of AAAS

In November 2011, the Council of the American Association for the Advancement of  Sciences (AAAS) elected 539 members as Fellows of the AAAS. These individuals will be recognized for their contributions to science and technology at the Fellows Forum to be held on 18 February 2012 during the AAAS Annual Meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia. Four faculty members from the UW Department of Chemistry were elected:

Daniel Chiu, A. Bruce Montgomery Professor of Chemistry and Endowed Professor in Analytical Chemistry

Daniel Gamelin, Harry and Catherine Jaynne Boand Endowed Professor of Chemistry

Karen Goldberg, Nicole A. Boand Endowed Professor in Chemistry

Bruce Robinson, Professor of Chemistry

See the full list of 2011 AAAS Fellows.

UW Chemistry Faculty Lead UW to Top Citation Impact in Materials Science

According to a recent report, the University of Washington led the world in impact of publications in materials science research during the period 2001-2011. This analysis, by Thomson-Reuters, focused on 800 papers published at the UW in the field of materials science, which were collectively cited about 24,000 times, achieving a remarkable 30.41 citations per publication. The UW’s performance was closely followed by a number of outstanding private and public institutions. Chemistry Chair Paul Hopkins points out that even in a large university such as the UW, the work of a small number of faculty members can strongly influence the outcome of such analyses. He points out that UW Chemistry Professor Daniel Gamelin, UW Chemistry and Materials Science Professor Alex Jen, UW Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Professor Samson Jenekhe, and former UW Chemistry Professor Younan Xia together published a total of nearly 750 papers  in that time period that were cited over 43,000 times, or 58 citations per paper. Though all of these papers were clearly not included in the Thomson-Reuters analysis, Hopkins believes that that the work of chemists Gamelin, Jen, Jenekhe, and Xia was critical to lifting the UW to the number one spot. Hopkins hopes that prospective graduate students and postdoctoral associates in this field will take notice of the UW’s outstanding performance and strongly consider joining this exciting program at the UW.

Spinning Quantum Dots reported in Nature Nanotechnology

Dr. Stefan Ochsenbein, a postdoc working with Prof. Daniel Gamelin, Harry and Catherine Jaynne Boand Endowed Professor of Chemistry, is lead author on a new paper published in Nature Nanotechnology reporting the first successful coherent impurity spin manipulation within colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (also known as quantum dots). Spin effects in semiconductor nanostructures have attracted broad interest for potential spin-based information processing technologies, whether in spin-electronics (“spintronics”) or spin-photonics. Colloidal doped semiconductor nanocrystals present interesting possibilities for constructing devices by solution processing or that involve integration with soft materials (e.g., organics), but their spin properties remain relatively untested. For example, the possibility to manipulate spins within colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals coherently, as would be necessary for many proposed applications, had not been demonstrated until these latest experiments.

In this paper, Ochsenbein and Gamelin describe the first observation of coherent spin manipulation in colloidal doped quantum dots. The observation was made by demonstrating microwave-driven Rabi oscillations within the high-spin ground states of Mn2+ impurity ions doped into colloidal ZnO semiconductor nanocrystals. Their electron spin-echo measurements revealed long spin coherence times approaching 1 µs, sufficient for potential qubit applications with optical excitation. The authors also identified previously unobserved hyperfine interactions between Mn2+ electron spins within the quantum dots and proton nuclear spins outside the quantum dots, revealing an important but previously unrecognized contribution to spin decoherence in such quantum dots.

Read the article: “Quantum oscillations in magnetically doped colloidal nanocrystals.” Ochsenbein, S. T.; Gamelin, D. R., Nature Nanotechnology, 2011, 6, 112–115.

To learn more about Prof. Gamelin’s research, visit his faculty webpage and research group website.

Gamelin et al. report light-induced spontaneous magnetization in Science

A paper by Professor Daniel Gamelin, members of his research group, and collaborators at the University of Duisberg-Essen appeared in the August 21, 2009 issue of Science, published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The paper details the spontaneous photoinduced polarization of Mn2+ spins in colloidal doped CdSE nanocrystals. Very large effective internal magnetic fields were observed up to ~50 K and photomagnetic effects are observed all the way up to room temperature.

Citation: “Light-Induced Spontaneous Magnetization in Doped Colloidal Quantum Dots” Rémi Beaulac, Lars Schneider, Paul I. Archer, Gerd Bacher, Daniel R. Gamelin, Science 325 (5943), 973 (21 August 2009) [DOI: 10.1126/science.1174419]

To view the abstract and full text, please visit Science magazine.

UW News press release

Daniel Gamelin promoted to Associate Professor

Assistant Professor Daniel Gamelin was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor, effective September 16, 2006.

Since his arrival at the UW in 1999, Gamelin has received several prominent national awards that recognize rising stars in the sciences, including a 2006 Sloan Research Fellowship, a 2005 Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, a 2004 Cottrell Scholar Award, a 2003 NSF CAREER Award, and a 2003 NSF PECASE.

For more information about Daniel Gamelin and his research, please see his faculty page or his research group website.

Daniel Gamelin receives Sloan Research Fellowship

Associate Professor Daniel Gamelin was awarded a highly competitive and prestigious Sloan Research Fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Sloan Research Fellowships are granted to enhance the careers of the top young academics in the sciences, and they carry a $40,000 grant over a two-year period. Currently there are 116 fellowships awarded annually across seven fields: chemistry, computational and evolutionary molecular biology, computer science, economics, mathematics, neuroscience, and physics.

For more information about the Sloan Fellowship and recent recipients, please see the Fellowship website.

For more information about Daniel Gamelin and his research, please see his faculty page or his research group website.