Stefan Stoll promoted to Associate Professor with Tenure

The Department of Chemistry congratulates Assistant Professor Stefan Stoll on his promotion to associate professor with tenure, effective September 16, 2018.

The Stoll research group uses cutting-edge magnetic resonance tools to study the structure and function of proteins and enzymes. Central to this work is their use of advanced electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, a spectroscopic method that provides information on the structure and dynamics of systems with unpaired electrons (i.e., paramagnetic systems)—while conceptually similar to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), in EPR the magnetic moments observed are electron spins rather than nuclear spins. In addition to continuing contributions to the field of theoretical and computational EPR spectroscopy, particularly through the EasySpin EPR spectra simulation package, the Stoll group is advancing the experimental and theoretical methodology for pulse EPR spectroscopy and its application to important problems in structural biology.

To learn more about Professor Stoll and his research program, please visit his faculty page and research group website.

Chemistry Team receives 2015 Distinguished Teaching Award for Innovation with Technology

boydston_bryant_craig_stoll_group 2A team of four Chemistry faculty members was awarded the 2015 Distinguished Teaching Award for Innovation with Technology. Lecturers Jasmine Bryant and Colleen Craig and Assistant Professors AJ Boydston and Stefan Stoll were jointly recognized for their innovative use of technology in our instructional program. They will be honored with other 2015 Awards of Excellence recipients at a public ceremony on Thursday, June 11, at 3:30 pm in Meany Hall.

While the team members have each worked to improve student learning through technology in their individual courses, the overall impact has been broad. Their courses cover the range in our curriculum, from large undergraduate lecture courses in introductory general chemistry (Bryant, Craig) and organic chemistry (Boydston, Bryant) up to courses for our senior majors and graduate students (Stoll). Within Chemistry, the team serves as a resource for our faculty, piloting and vetting new technologies, advising our faculty on how best to adopt these technologies, generating a repository of modules, video mini-lectures, and tutorials shared among faculty, and making major contributions to curricular redesign. They have lowered the barrier for other faculty to make changes in their teaching, facilitating peer learning among colleagues in Chemistry as well as in other departments across campus. The efforts of all four are appreciated by the thousands of students they teach each year, who consistently reward their efforts with outstanding student course evaluation ratings.

Team members have been recognized for their experience and expertise in teaching at the local and national level. Bryant and Craig have participated in the Cottrell Scholars Collaborative National Teaching Assistant Workshop as well as a variety of teaching and learning initiatives at the UW, and Bryant received the 2013 “Most Engaging Lecturer” Award from the UW Panhellenic Association & Interfraternity Council. The Research Corporation for Science Advancement has honored Boydston (2014) and Stoll (2015) with the Cottrell Scholar Award, which recognizes 10-15 innovative early career teacher-scholars in chemistry, physics and astronomy at U.S. institutions.

The University of Washington established the Distinguished Teaching Award in 1970 and five are given annually to faculty members from the Seattle campus. Recipients are chosen based on a variety of criteria, including mastery of the subject matter; enthusiasm and innovation in the teaching and learning process and in course and curriculum design; to inspire, guide, and mentor students through independent and creative thinking; and mentoring other faculty and teaching assistants to help enrich the scholarship of teaching and learning. Faculty members in Seattle who receive the Distinguished Teaching Awards are inducted into the UW Teaching Academy, where they will be able to participate in a variety of Academy-sponsored projects and events to further excellence in the teaching and learning process at the UW.

Boydston, Bryant, Craig, and Stoll will be honored with the other 2015 Awards of Excellence recipients at a public ceremony on Thursday, June 11, at 3:30 pm in Meany Hall. For more information about the 2015 Awards of Excellence, which honor UW achievements in teaching, mentoring, public service, and staff support, please visit the Awards of Excellence website.

Stefan Stoll named a 2015 Cottrell Scholar

Stoll_headshot_150pxAssistant Professor Stefan Stoll has received a 2015 Cottrell Scholar Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement (RCSA). The Cottrell Scholar Award provides $75,000 in funding to support innovative teaching and research. The RSCA granted fifteen awards this year to early career scientists in the fields of chemistry, physics, and astronomy at institutions across the United States, recognizing the recipients as outstanding teacher-scholars with innovative research programs and academic leadership skills.

Stoll uses an experimental biophysical approach to pursue a deeper understanding of the molecular structure and dynamics of proteins and protein complexes that underlie the mechanisms of all chemical processes in life. He is developing highly sensitive and accurate methods to measure the flexibility of protein shapes using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, a pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique that measures nanometer-scale distances between spin labels attached to proteins, allowing the determination of conformational distributions and flexibility in a manner unattainable by other methods. With DEER, it is possible to distinguish rigid proteins from flexible ones, and to quantify and visualize the flexibility, though Stoll is also working to significantly increase the sensitivity of the DEER technique to improve its use as a measurement tool.

As an educator, Stoll is interested in enhancing student engagement and increasing learning outcomes through the use of digital media. He is working to design and produce an extensive series of brief lecture videos and a set of tutorial videos, which will be integrated into his physical chemistry courses, as well as an online open-access textbook for undergraduates in physical chemistry.

Please visit the Research Corporation website for more information about the Cottrell Scholars program and the 2015 award recipients.

For more information about Professor Stoll and his research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.

Stefan Stoll wins NSF CAREER Award

Stoll_headshot_150pxAssistant Professor Stefan Stoll has received a CAREER (Faculty Early Career Development) Award from the National Science Foundation. The CAREER Program is a Foundation-wide program that “offers the National Science Foundation’s most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations.”

Stoll uses an experimental biophysical approach to pursue a deeper understanding of the molecular structure and dynamics of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions that underlie the mechanisms of all chemical processes in life. His NSF CAREER Award research proposal, “CAREER: Elucidating conformational landscapes in proteins using high-sensitivity pulse EPR spectroscopy,” will use high-sensitivity double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy—a pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique that measures nanometer-scale distances between spin labels attached to proteins, allowing the determination of conformational distributions and flexibility in a manner unattainable by other methods—to quantitatively elucidate the conformational distributions in a model protein and in an ion channel.

Stoll’s project will advance understanding of the dynamics of protein host and ligand interactions and the regulation thereof on a molecular level. The foundational knowledge gained through this work is a key prerequisite to the rational design of new drugs and therapies, and the experimental insights will inform ongoing efforts to develop models of protein-protein interactions. The innovative EPR spectroscopic techniques being developed by Stoll are transformational, and will open up a broad range of new possibilities for probing molecular structure and dynamics.

For more information about the NSF CAREER Award program, please visit the program website.

For more information about Professor Stoll and his research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.

UW researchers uncover the molecular basis of the heartbeat

Stoll HCNconformationchange editAssistant Professor Stefan Stoll (Chemistry), Professor William Zagotta (Physiology & Biophysics), and co-workers have used double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy to determine the structural origins of the regulatory function of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) on an important ion channel. Their work reveals that binding of the cAMP induces a large structural change in the intracellular part of the channel. The ion channel studied, a hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channel, is critical to the function of heart, as it is part of the heart’s natural pacemaker. The HCN channel is crucial in regulating the heartbeat: binding of cAMP to HCN increases of the heart rate. This work, reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could form the basis for better drug design for disorders of electrical signaling in the heart. (A movie showing a model of the structural change can be downloaded in Quicktime format from: http://felix.chem.washington.edu/HCN_DEER_movie.mov.)

To learn more about Professor Stoll and his research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.

To learn more about Professor Zagotta and his research, please visit his faculty page.

Stefan Stoll to join faculty

We are delighted to welcome Dr. Stefan Stoll to the Department of Chemistry. Dr. Stoll is a world-leading expert in the field of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy.

Dr. Stoll obtained a degree in Chemical Engineering from the Technical University Graz, Austria, and then earned his Ph.D. in 2003 under the direction of Arthur Schweiger at ETH Zurich, Switzerland. Dr. Stoll is currently a postdoctoral research associate with R. David Britt at the University of California Davis, where he is investigating the mechanisms and active-site structures of radical enzymes and redox proteins using EPR.

Dr. Stoll will begin his research activities here in August. He will focus on elucidating the electronic and geometric structure of spin centers in metallo- and radical proteins, on understanding the structure of spin centers in a variety of materials, and on developing EPR methods with ever increasing sensitivity and resolution.

For more information, please contact him directly via email at stoll@chem.washington.edu.