Munira Khalil promoted to Associate Professor with Tenure

khalilThe Department of Chemistry congratulates Assistant Professor Munira Khalil on her promotion to associate professor with tenure, effective September 16, 2014.

Professor Khalil’s research focuses on the development and application of advanced spectroscopic techniques to understand the ultrafast structural dynamics of light-driven chemical and biological processes in solution. Using multidimensional infrared (IR) and ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopies, the Khalil group studies how coupled electron and vibrational motions and their interactions with the surrounding solvent dictate the course of ultrafast charge transfer reactions in chemical and biological systems. This work will ultimately provide fundamental understanding of molecular energetics and the dynamics of chemical reactions, with broad practical applications in the design of new materials and molecular devices.

To learn more about Professor Khalil’s research, please visit her faculty page and her research group website.

Munira Khalil selected for 2014 Journal of Physical Chemistry B Lectureship

khalilAssistant Professor Munira Khalil has been named one of the 2014 Journal of Physical Chemistry lecturers by the Physical Chemistry Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS). Lecturers will present their work at a special symposium at the Fall ACS National Meeting in San Francisco (August 10-14, 2014). The lectureships were established to recognize the contributions of young investigators who have made major impacts on the field of physical chemistry related to research areas published in the Journals of Physical Chemistry; Professor Khalil’s lectureship is for the Journal of Physical Chemistry B covering biophysical chemistry, biomaterials, liquids, and soft matter.

To learn more about this award, please see the ACS lectureship announcement. To learn more about Professor Khalil’s research, visit her faculty page and her research group site.

Munira Khalil named a 2013 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar

khalilAssistant Professor Munira Khalil has been named a 2013 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar by The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation. The Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program supports the research and teaching careers of talented young faculty in the chemical sciences. Based on institutional nominations, the program provides discretionary funding to faculty at an early stage in their careers. Criteria for selection include an independent body of scholarship attained within the first five years of their appointment as independent researchers, and a demonstrated commitment to education, signaling the promise of continuing outstanding contributions to both research and teaching. The Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program provides an unrestricted research grant of $75,000.

To learn more about the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program, please visit the Dreyfus Foundation website. To learn more about Prof. Khalil, please visit her website and research group page.

Munira Khalil and Bo Zhang awarded Sloan Research Fellowships

Two members of the UW Department of Chemistry faculty are recipients of Sloan Research Fellowships, awarded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Assistant Professors Munira Khalil and Bo Zhang each received a fellowship, which are “given to early-career scientists and scholars whose achievements and potential identify them as rising stars, the next generation of scientific leaders.”

Professor Khalil studies how coupled electron and vibrational motions and their interactions with the surrounding solvent dictate the course of ultrafast charge transfer reactions in chemical and biological systems. To learn more about Professor Khalil’s research, please visit her faculty page and research group website.

Professor Zhang’s research focuses mainly on fundamental and applied aspects of electrochemistry and bioanalytical chemistry using nanoelectrodes. His group is interested in developing new electrochemical methods to study electrocatalysis in single molecules and single nanoparticles, and to image neuronal communication at nanoscale resolution. To learn more about Professor Zhang’s research, please visit his faculty page and research group website.

The Sloan Research Fellowships have been awarded since 1955, initially in only three areas: physics, chemistry and mathematics. Since then, 38 Sloan Research Fellows have gone on to win the Nobel Prize in their fields, and 16 have received the Fields Medal, the top honor in mathematics. The program now also recognizes researchers in economics, computer science, economics, evolutionary and computational molecular biology and neuroscience; this year it expanded to include ocean sciences.

The fellowships include a grant of $50,000 over a two-year period. Once chosen, Sloan Research Fellows are free to pursue whatever lines of inquiry are of most interest to them, and they are permitted to employ Fellowship funds in a wide variety of ways to further their research aims.

“Today’s Sloan Research Fellows are tomorrow’s Nobel Prize winners,” said foundation president Paul Joskow. “These outstanding men and women are responsible for some of the most exciting science being done today. The Foundation is proud to support them during this pivotal stage of their careers.”

Munira Khalil receives NSF CAREER Award

Assistant Professor Munira Khalil has received a 2009 CAREER (Faculty Early Career Development) Award from the National Science Foundation. The CAREER Program is a Foundation-wide program that “offers the National Science Foundation’s most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations.”

Khalil received her NSF CAREER Award for her research proposal, “CAREER: Correlation of coupled electronic and nuclear motions in biological photoreceptors using femtosecond multidimensional spectroscopies.”

For more information about the NSF CAREER Award program, please visit the program website.

For more information about Munira Khalil and her research program, please visit her faculty page.

Munira Khalil joins faculty as Assistant Professor

We are delighted to welcome Dr. Munira Khalil as a new Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry. Dr. Khalil earned her Ph.D. in 2004 from the Masssachusetts Institute of Technology under Professor Andrei Tokmakoff, a pioneer in the field of two-dimensional (2D) infrared spectroscopy. Dr. Khalil’s graduate work resulted in her receiving a Lester Wolfe Graduate Fellowship and established her as one of the best young spectroscopists in her field. She was then the recipient of a highly competitive Miller Research Fellowship to support her postdoctoral research at the University of California-Berkeley with Professor Stephen Leone.

Dr. Khalil’s research program aims to understand the ultrafast structural dynamics of light-driven chemical and biological processes in solution. For more information about her research program, please visit her faculty page or contact her directly at mkhalil@chem.washington.edu.

Munira Khalil receives Dreyfus New Faculty Award

Assistant Professor Munira Khalil received a 2007 Dreyfus New Faculty Award from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation. The Dreyfus Foundation was created with the mission to “advance the science of chemistry, chemical engineering and related sciences as a means of improving human relations and circumstances,” and the organization has created several awards for academics in the chemical sciences. Dreyfus New Faculty Awards help to initiate the independent research programs of new faculty in Ph.D.-granting departments with an unrestricted research grant of $50,000 over five years that is generally approved before the new faculty members formally begin their first tenure-track appointments.

Khalil received her Dreyfus New Faculty Award for her project, “Mapping vibrational phase and energy relaxation during photoinduced electron transfer processes using femtosecond two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.” Khalil joined the UW Department of Chemistry in September 2007.

For more information about the Dreyfus New Faculty Award program, please see the program website.

For information about Munira Khalil and her research program, please visit her faculty page.